Baconian Cipher

Francis Bacon created this method of hiding one message within another. It is not a true cipher, but just a way to conceal your secret text within plain sight. The way it originally worked is that the writer would use two different typefaces. One would be the "A" typeface and the other would be "B". Your message would be written with the two fonts intermingled, thus hiding your message within a perfectly normal text.

There are two versions. The first uses the same code for I and J, plus the same code for U and V. The second uses distict codes for every letter.

For example, let's take the message "Test It" and encode it with the distinct codes for each letter. You get a result like "BAABBAABAABAABABAABB ABAAABAABB". The original message is 6 characters long so the encoded version is 6 * 5 = 30 characters. If I were to find a 30-character message and put in "B" letters as bold and italics, we will get "This is a test message with bold for "B".".

When decoding, it will use "0", "A", and "a" as an "A"; "1", "B", and "b" are all equivalent as well. Other letters are ignored.

Your message: (Swap A and B)

This is your encoded or decoded text:

In 1987, engineer Scott Stillinger invented the Koosh ball from tied-together rubber bands. The ball gets its name from the sound it makes when you catch it. Tyler Akins <>
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