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Animals

  • 2008-10-16: A blindfolded dolphin can find a nickel at the bottom of its tank.
  • 2006-11-17: Hummingbirds are the only animal that can hover, fly backwards, and fly in any direction.
  • 2006-11-03: Rats multiply so quickly that in 18 months, two rats could have over a million descendants.
  • 2006-10-23: If you add the circumference of two feet of an elephant, you will get the elephant's height.
  • 2006-10-23: As long as they are alive, snakes never stop growing.
  • 2006-10-10: Worldwide, the bat is the most important natural enemy of night-flying insects.
  • 2006-10-04: In a study of 200,000 ostriches over a period of 80 years, there wasn't one single case where an ostrich attempted to bury its head in the sand.
  • 2006-10-04: It is physically impossible for a pig to look up into the sky.
  • 2006-09-19: You can determine the approximate age of a rattlesnake by counting the number of its rattles. It gains one rattle every time it molts.
  • 2006-09-19: Snakes are found on all continents, including Antarctica.
  • 2006-09-13: The heaviest snake is the green anaconda, weighing over 300 pounds.
  • 2006-09-13: All snakes are carnivorous, but they refuse to eat crab meat.
  • 2006-09-12: Spitting cobras use their fangs in order to spit their venom. They aim for your eyes and can spit up to 3 meters (10 feet).
  • 2006-09-12: Baby snakes are often more dangerous than their parents. Young snakes don't yet have the self-control and will release much higher doses of venom in their bites.
  • 2006-09-07: The venom from a single bite of a cobra can kill an elephant.
  • 2006-09-07: Snake venom is a complex mixture of proteins that rapidly spread through the victim's body. The type that kills the quickest is neurotoxic venom, which destroys the nervous system.
  • 2006-08-29: Pythons have very flexible jaws and immensely muscular bodies. They will crush and eat just about anything. A large meal, such as a human, will sustain the snake for a year or more.
  • 2006-08-29: The Black Mamba, which is from Africa, is among the most deadly and is also the fastest snake. It can travel up to 19.3 kph (16 mph).
  • 2006-08-22: No snakes are poisonous - they are venomous. Venom has to be injected. Poison is eaten, drank, or touched.
  • 2006-08-22: Only 25% of snakes are venomous.
  • 2006-08-22: The most deadly snake is the Inland Taipan of Australia. The venom from a single bite could kill 100 humans.
  • 2006-08-22: A ball python namd Popeye holds the record for the oldest snake - he was 47 years old.
  • 2006-08-22: Before shedding their skin, snakes become quite inacive and won't eat. Their eyes become cloudy and their bodies will become dull and turn blue.
  • 2006-08-22: The garter snake does not lay eggs. It gives birth directly to live babies.
  • 2006-08-22: The reticulated python is the longest snake, growing up to 10 meters (33 feet) in length.
  • 2006-08-22: A rattlesnake can still bite you up to a day after it dies. Its heat sensors don't die out right away and you're in danger until rigor sets in.
  • 2006-08-01: The original Winnie the Pooh was found outside of Winnipeg, Canada, which is the basis of its name.
  • 2006-07-17: Roosters can not crow if they extend their necks.
  • 2006-05-24: Cats have 32 muscles controlling each ear.
  • 2006-05-09: Do not give your dog chocolate. It affects the animal's heart and nervous system and a few ounces is enough to kill a small sized dog. White chocolate, while not the same as actual chocolate, also acts as a toxin and is very bad for your pup.
  • 2006-05-03: A female ferret will die if she goes into heat and does not find a mate. She stays in heat and will succumb to infection or aplastic anemia, and has a most painful death.
  • 2006-04-06: Eddie Rusomanno, a New Jersey shoemaker, had his pet canary, Jimmy, die in 1920. The bird was placed in a white casket and a funeral was held in his memory. 10,000 people attended and there was a procession of two coaches and a 15-piece band.
  • 2006-04-06: Elizabeth Taylor's favorite childhood pet was her chipmunk named Nibbles. Taylor even wrote a book about it, "Nibbles and Me."
  • 2006-04-04: Harpo Marx named his pet seagull "Siegel."
  • 2006-04-04: A Canadian toy poodle, Chanda-Leah, has been trained to perform over 300 tricks, such as playing the piano, counting, and spelling. She even has her own publicist.
  • 2006-04-03: The family dog in the Walt Disney home was a poodle named Lady.
  • 2006-04-03: Morris the Cat was once a stray in Chicago. He was rescued from an animal shelter in 1968. Over the next 10 years, he starred in 40 television commercials for Nine Lives cat food.
  • 2006-03-30: The role of Lassie in the show Lassie was played by nine dogs. The first was named Pal, the last was named Howard.
  • 2006-03-29: A cat will use its whiskers to gage whether a space is large enough for the cat to fit.
  • 2006-03-29: An adult cat will be in a light sleep for 50% of its life and in a deep sleep an additional 15%. That means a cat is sleeping 65% of the time!
  • 2006-03-29: You can extend your cat's lifespan by 2 to 3 years by neutering it.
  • 2006-03-23: A cat's normal body temperature is 38.6° C (101.5° F).
  • 2006-03-23: In his will, Ben Rea bequeathed $15 million to his cat, Blackie.
  • 2006-03-13: A cat has 60 vertebrae, which allows it to make such large arches with its back.
  • 2006-03-13: The Affenpinscher is a breed of dog and its name means "monkey terrier" in German.
  • 2006-03-13: The "Airedale" was originally known as a waterside terrier. This breed of dog was bred and shown at a local agricultural show. The judge renamed the dog to reflect the place where it originated, the Aire river valley.
  • 2006-03-07: A dog pulling a sled in Alaska's 1149 mile long Iditarod race will burn about 10,000 calories each day.
  • 2006-03-07: A whippet is a breed of dog created by crossing a greyhound with a terrier.
  • 2006-03-06: The Chihuahua came from the northern part of Mexico, in the town of Chihuahua. It was first documented there in the mid-1800's.
  • 2006-03-06: The Chihuahua is thought to be a descendant of the ancient Techichi, a tiny dog of Mexico's Toltec population since the 9th century.
  • 2006-03-06: The dog on a box of Cracker Jacks is named Bingo.
  • 2006-03-01: The animal known as Canis Familiaris Aquatius is also known as the French Poodle.
  • 2006-03-01: The Jack Russel terrier takes its name from the English minister Reverend John Russel, who was the first person to breed them.
  • 2006-02-27: Dogs are mentioned in the Bible 14 times.
  • 2006-02-20: All breeds of dogs have a 9 week gestation period.
  • 2006-02-20: The daschshund is a German badger-hunting dog. Its name translates to "badger hound."
  • 2006-02-20: Dogs do not sweat by panting or salivating. They sweat through the pads of their feet.
  • 2006-02-20: The top five breeds of dogs that will most likely have health problems, in order: Boxer, Irish wolfhound, Great Dane, Doberman, Schnauzer.
  • 2006-02-17: The breed of dog that bites the most is the German shepherd. The chow came in second.
  • 2006-02-17: Berkshire, Cheshire, Victoria, and Poland China are different breeds of pigs.
  • 2006-02-17: Franklin D. Roosevelt's dog, Fala, was buried next to the President because he adored it so much.
  • 2006-02-15: A healthy adult dog has 42 teeth; 20 on top and 22 on the bottom.
  • 2006-02-15: An adult opossum has 50 teeth.
  • 2006-02-15: All breeds of dogs except the chow have pink tongues. Chows have black tongues.
  • 2006-02-15: The six most popular breeds of dogs are the Labrador retriever, Golden retriever, German shepherd, dachshund, beagle, and poodle, in that order.
  • 2006-02-10: A cow produces 200 times more gas than a human.
  • 2006-02-10: A blind chameleon still changes color to match the environment.
  • 2006-02-10: A chameleon's tongue is twice its body length.
  • 2006-01-30: Deer-related accidents in the U.S. cost $1.1 billion yearly.
  • 2006-01-17: About 30,000 cats and dogs are humanely destroyed in U.S. animal shelters every day.
  • 2006-01-17: Americans spend about $5.4 billion on their pets each year.
  • 2006-01-17: The most popular pets in America are cats, dogs, parakeets, small rodents, fish, and reptiles; in that order.
  • 2006-01-12: Three out of ten American households own one or more cats. Of the households that own cats, 51% of them own two or more.
  • 2006-01-11: Alligators can run up to 48 kph (30 mph). They prefer the snatch-and-grab method of hunting and save their speed for emergency retreats back to the water.
  • 2006-01-10: Dogs sniff each other for a myriad of reasons, but it is often used to determine position in the dog hierarchy. When a dominant dog approaches, a submissive pup will secrete the scent of fear from glands located around their genitals. Also, dog can remember another by the odor, even after years of separation.
  • 2005-11-17: The Dachshund was bred by German farmers to hunt dachs (Gemarn for badgers), which disrupted their herds of cattle or sheep. It can fit deeply into a badger's tunnel, clamp onto the badger, and then would back out. Its long, floppy ears would cover its eyes, providing some protection against the badger. If the dog got stuck in the hole, the long tail could be used as a handle to help pull the pup out.
  • 2005-11-16: The French poodle originated in Germany and was bred specifically for hunting in marshes. They are especially strong swimmers, able to retrieve ducks shot down over water. Their name derives from the German "Pudelhund," which literally translates to "splash in water dog." In France, they call the dog a "caniche," which means "duck dog."
  • 2005-10-24: Geese fly in a V formation because it is aerodynamically efficient and it allows each bird in the flock the ability to see the leader, who determines their speed and direction.
  • 2005-10-11: When Captain Cook first landed on Australia, he asked the aboriginal tribe of the Endeavor River what they named a peculiar animal. They must have not quite understood the question, since they replied "I don't know" in their language, which sounds like "kangaroo." Cook mistakenly thought that it was the name of the animal.
  • 2005-09-30: A raccoon gets its name from the Algonquin Indian word for "scratcher." It's named that because it uses it paws to get at almost anything it wants.
  • 2005-08-12: African elephants have a brain that weighs 7.5 kg (16.5 lb) but that is only 0.15% of their total weight.
  • 2005-08-12: A cow's brain to body weight ratio is 0.08%.
  • 2005-08-12: A sparrow's brain to body weight ratio is 4%.
  • 2005-08-11: 5% of a spider monkey's weight is just its brain, which is more than a human, elephant, cow, or sperm whale.
  • 2005-08-01: When a horse is riding between a trot and a gallop, it is called a canter. The name comes from people making the pilgrimage to the shrine of Thomas A. Becket at Canterbury, for they traveled at a canter.
  • 2005-07-14: Sir Richard Owen, a British anatomist, proposed in 1842 that dinosaur should be the formal zoological name for those extinct giant reptiles. It was derived from Greek for terrible lizard, but it never caught on with the scientific community. The formal categories are Saurischia and Ornithischia.
  • 2005-05-10: The sperm whale was given its name due to the large amounts of liquid wax in its head, which is one-third of its length. People originally thought the wax was excessive reproductive fluid, but it really is an oily wax that assists the whale in regulating water pressure and directional bearings.
  • 2005-04-08: A crocodile can't stick out its tongue.
  • 2005-04-08: Polar bears are left-handed.
  • 2005-03-15: An armadillo can smell insects that are buried up to 20 cm (8 in) underground.
  • 2005-03-15: Armadillos are heavy for their size, denser than water. They cross small streams by walking on the bottom completely submerged. They are able to go for as long as ten minutes without breathing. Not only is this ability useful for crossing water but when escaping danger, it enables them to dig fast and vigorously without uncovering their nose and mouth for breathing. If a river is wide and they have to swim, they swallow air to inflate their stomachs and intestines for buoyancy and float across.
  • 2005-03-15: The "Ides" is the 15th of March, May, July, and October. It is the 13th for the rest of the months.
  • 2005-03-15: Because armadillos have a body temperature of 30°-35° C (87°-95° F), they have been used to grow the leprosy bacilli and create a vaccine against the ancient disease.
  • 2005-03-14: An armadillo carries nesting material to its burrow by holding the leaves and grass underneath its body and hopping backwards, using its tail as a feeler.
  • 2005-03-14: Armadillos are the only mammals with armor, which is called a carapace.
  • 2005-03-14: The only armadillo that can roll into a ball is the three-banded armadillo, which is native to South America.
  • 2005-03-14: An armadillo can dig so fast that it can completely bury itself in under two minutes.
  • 2005-03-14: Because armadillos reflexively jump straight up when scared (up to 0.9 m [3 feet]), they are unfortunately the victim of many vehicles. Instead of having the car barely miss them and go over, they jump and hit the front or the underside of the car.
  • 2005-03-11: A bobcat can be distinguished from a common house cat by counting its teeth. Bobcats have 28, while housecats have 30.
  • 2005-03-09: Armadillos bury their excrement in a manner similar to cats.
  • 2005-03-03: Armadillo means "little armored one" in Spanish. When the early Spanish explorer Hernándo Cortéz encountered them in Mexico in 1520, he gave them their name and even took one back to Spain to show the royal family.
  • 2005-03-01: Armadillos have been around for more than 55 million years.
  • 2005-03-01: The only armadillo naturally found in the U.S. is the nine-banded armadillo.
  • 2005-02-24: Armadillos mate in the late summer and early fall. The female usually delays implantation of the embryo for three months, and then develops the babies for four months. With this timing, the babies are born in springtime, when food is plentiful. If under stressful conditions, the mother can delay her pregnancy up to an additional three years. This extended, delayed implantation is longer than any other animal.
  • 2005-02-23: The armadillo is the only animal that performs natural cloning. The mother armadillo produces four identical babies per litter. Sometimes an embryo or two may die, and you will get triplets or twins instead of the intended quadruplets.
  • 2005-01-11: The Doberman was named after the breeder, Ludwig Dobermann. In addition to being a dog breeder, he was also a tax collector. He developed the breed to aid him in the efficiency of his collections.
  • 2004-12-09: The albatross can glide on air currents for several days and can even sleep while in flight.
  • 2004-12-08: The digestive juices of crocodiles contain so much hydrochloric acid that they have dissolved swallowed iron spearheads and 15 cm (6 in) steel hooks.
  • 2004-12-06: Elephants have been known to remain standing after they die.
  • 2004-12-06: A prehistoric horse called Eohippus was approximately the size of a house cat.
  • 2004-11-30: The ostrich egg yolk is the biggest single cell in the world.
  • 2004-11-24: Most of the turkeys raised on turkey farms are White Hollands. This type of turkey can't fly.
  • 2004-10-26: Some so-called vampire bats do drink blood, but they are not from Transylvania. they are from Central and South America and they feed on cattle, horses, and birds.
  • 2004-10-21: A giraffe sleeps only 2 hours a day.
  • 2004-10-21: Hippopotamus sweat is a shade of red that gradually turns brown. It also acts like a sunscreen, has antibiotic properties, and is quite stinky.
  • 2004-10-18: An average elephant's brain weighs 6 kg (13 lbs).
  • 2004-10-18: The brain of a cat weighs about 30 g (1 oz).
  • 2004-10-15: If an orangutan belches at you, he is warning you to stay out of his territory.
  • 2004-09-07: Bats are voracious insect eaters, devouring as many as 600 bugs per hour for 4 to 6 hours each night. They can eat from ½ to ¾ their body weight each evening.
  • 2004-09-03: More than 1,000,000 stray dogs and 500,000 stray cats live in the New York City metropolitan area.
  • 2004-09-03: 90% of all species that have become extinct have been birds.
  • 2004-08-31: The average koala sleeps 22 hours daily.
  • 2004-08-31: Galapagos turtles can take up to 3 weeks to digest a meal.
  • 2004-08-31: A jackrabbit can travel more than 3.6 m (12 ft) in one hoop.
  • 2004-08-30: There are approximately two chicken per person in the world.
  • 2004-08-27: Each year, 200,000 cliff swallows fly 3,000 miles from Argentina to western Nebraska.
  • 2004-08-16: Each porcupine has about 30,000 quills.
  • 2004-07-28: Seals sleep 1 ½ minutes at a time.
  • 2004-07-28: Only humans and koalas have unique fingerprints.
  • 2004-07-28: Penguins have an organ above their eyes that converts seawater to fresh water.
  • 2004-07-27: Goats don't eat cans. The reason they are associated with eating cans is because they really like the glue that keeps the labels on.
  • 2004-07-27: Beavers were once the size of bears.
  • 2004-07-27: Pidgeons have been trained by the U.S. Coast Guard to spot people lost at sea.
  • 2004-07-27: A pigeon's feathers are heaver than its bones.
  • 2004-07-20: A male kangaroo is called a boomer.
  • 2004-07-20: A female kangaroo is called a flyer.
  • 2004-07-20: Giraffes can lick their own eyes and ears.
  • 2004-07-15: The Basenji is the only breed of dog that doesn't bark, but it does yodel, howl, whine, and growl.
  • 2004-07-12: A rhinoceros's horn has no bony core and is made of a matted keratinous material; the same stuff that is in hair, fingernails, and hooves.
  • 2004-07-12: Rabbits are more closely related to horses than they are to rodents or mice.
  • 2004-06-29: Cats' urine glows under a blacklight.
  • 2004-06-28: Humans are the only primates that don't have pigment on the palms of their hands.
  • 2004-06-23: Goats have rectangular pupils.
  • 2004-06-23: The chemical most commonly used to clean elephants is Murphy's Oil Soap.
  • 2004-05-13: The spiny-tailed iguana of Costa Rica is the world's fastest reptile and has been clocked at 34.9 kph (21.7 mph).
  • 2004-05-13: A donkey will sink in quicksand, but a mule won't.
  • 2004-05-10: Frogs never drink.
  • 2004-05-10: Frogs breathe through their skin.
  • 2004-05-10: The fastest recorded speed for a racehorse is over 69 kph (43 mph).
  • 2004-05-10: The oldest known animal was a tortoise who lived to be 152 years old.
  • 2004-05-04: Lizards communicate by doing push-ups.
  • 2004-04-15: A male elephant is called a bull.
  • 2004-03-24: Turtles can never die of old age. They exhibit "negligible senescence" -- they don't continue to age biologically once their bodies reach maturity. Turtles have even been known to live beyond 150 years without showing any signs of old age. Certain fish also share this characteristic.
  • 2004-03-23: A kangaroo can jump 9 m (30 ft) in a single bound.
  • 2004-03-23: At birth, dalmatians are pure white.
  • 2004-03-23: Bamboo makes up 99% of a panda's diet.
  • 2004-03-22: The scientific name for the American Robin is turdus migratorius.
  • 2004-03-10: Sweat glands for dogs and cows are located in their noses.
  • 2004-03-02: A cow doesn't have four stomachs -- it has one stomach with four separate chambers.
  • 2004-02-17: Bats, like people, usually give birth to one baby at a time, with rare instances of twins.
  • 2004-02-13: Cats have over 100 vocal sounds, with about 16 vocal patterns. Dogs have only about 10 vocal sounds.
  • 2004-02-05: In some penguin roosting areas, there isn't much available for nest building, so many penguin species use rocks. The shape and size of the rock matter a great deal, so penguins will often beg, steal, and quarrel over an ideal rock.
  • 2004-02-04: A newborn kangaroo is just a hairless, fetus-like thing about the size of a small peanut. It lives in its mom's marsupium (pouch) for 6 or 7 months before finally becoming a miniature version of its parents.
  • 2004-02-03: There are about 4,000 types of mammals on Earth.
  • 2004-02-02: Bears can run 50 - 55 kph (30 - 35 mph) and can run uphill without losing speed.
  • 2004-01-30: Humans and elephants are the only two mammals that have been trained to stand on their head.
  • 2004-01-29: A cat's lower jaw can not move sideways.
  • 2004-01-29: Cats can hear ultrasound.
  • 2004-01-29: Dogs can hear ultrasound.
  • 2004-01-29: Rodents can hear ultrasound beyond what cats and dogs can hear.
  • 2004-01-29: Some bats use ultrasound for echo location.
  • 2004-01-29: Deer can not hear ultrasound. So, buying ultrasonic deer repellents won't do much for repelling deer.
  • 2004-01-29: Elephants can hear infrasound (sounds lower than what the average human can hear).
  • 2004-01-26: Horses, rats, and rabbits can not vomit.
  • 2004-01-26: Giraffes have no vocal chords.
  • 2004-01-22: The bullfrog is the only animal that never sleeps.
  • 2004-01-21: It is possible to lead a cow up stairs but not down stairs.
  • 2004-01-21: Frogs can't swallow with their eyes open.
  • 2004-01-02: Emus and kangaroos can not walk backwards.
  • 2004-01-02: A hummingbird weighs less than a penny.
  • 2003-12-30: Baby flamingos are white, but later turn pink because they eat so much shrimp. Change the diet and the bird will turn white again.
  • 2003-12-29: A cat will eat 28 times its weight each year, which should be about 534.5 kiloJoules (127,750 calories).
  • 2003-12-29: A cat will drink 28 times its weight in liquids each year.
  • 2003-12-29: A cat can not survive on a vegetarian diet, nor can it survive on just fish.
  • 2003-12-04: A camel has 3 eyelids.
  • 2003-12-04: Camel's milk does not curdle.
  • 2003-12-04: Despite its hump, a camel has a straight spine.
  • 2003-12-04: The hummingbird is the only bird that can fly backwards.
  • 2003-12-04: A hummingbird's heart beats 1,400 times a minute.
  • 2003-12-04: A hummingbird does not sleep - it hibernates at night to save energy.
  • 2003-12-04: Small hummingbirds flap their wings 38-78 times a second while larger ones flap about 18-28 times a second.
  • 2003-12-03: Elephants are capable of swimming up to 32 km (20 miles) per day.
  • 2003-12-03: Elephants are the only mammals that can't jump.
  • 2003-12-02: All porcupines float in water.
  • 2003-12-02: Beavers can hold their breath for 45 minutes.
  • 2003-12-01: Chickens are 75% water.
  • 2003-12-01: Elephants are 70% water.
  • 2003-11-26: Domesticated turkeys can not fly, however, wild ones can fly up to 88 kph (55 mph) for short distances and can run up to 40 kph (25 mph).
  • 2003-11-25: Only male turkeys (toms) gobble. Female turkeys (hens) make a clicking noise.
  • 2003-11-25: A gobbling turkey can be heard a mile away on a clear day.
  • 2003-11-25: Male turkeys (toms) gobble seasonally -- in the spring and fall. Females (hens) are attracted to the sound for mating. Wild toms also gobble when they hear loud sounds or when they settle in for a night.
  • 2003-11-20: Cats sleep 13-18 hours per day.
  • 2003-11-20: Elephants sleep 2 hours per day.
  • 2003-11-18: The bones of a pigeon weigh less than its feathers.
  • 2003-11-17: Sheep can recognize faces.
  • 2003-11-17: Cows navigate by looking at the ground (down) instead of using landmarks (out/across), so they get lost when it floods.
  • 2003-11-10: An ostrich's eye is bigger than its brain.
  • 2003-11-05: Skunks can shoot their stinky spray (butylmercaptan) only about 1.8 - 3 m (6 - 10 ft), but it can be smelled up to 4 km (2.5 miles) away with the human nose and detected up to 30 km (20 miles) away by other animals.
  • 2003-10-22: Animals that hatch from eggs don't have bellybuttons.
  • 2003-10-20: Pigs can get sunburn.
  • 2003-10-20: A pig's sweat glands are nonfunctional, so they are unable to sweat.
  • 2003-10-20: Pigs wallow in mud to cool off and for protection from the sun and insects.
  • 2003-10-20: Pig insulin can be used in diabetic humans.
  • 2003-10-20: Many pig organs can be temporarily or (sometimes permanently) transplanted into humans.
  • 2003-10-20: Pigs are the cleanest barnyard animals and will take showers if facilities are made accessible.
  • 2003-10-16: Mosquitos are attracted to people who recently ate bananas.
  • 2003-10-15: A rat can last longer than a camel without water. A camel can last a week or more during the hottest months and up to six months in a row without a drink of water during the cooler months. Although I could not find similar information for rats, the types of rats that can outlast a camel are likely a dusky rat or a kangaroo rat.
  • 2003-10-10: Polar bears have black skin. They look white because their fur has no color, and thus it reflects the sunlight. Additionally, a polar bear's fur is hollow.
The heaviest pumpkin in the world weighed 1385 pounds. This gigantic gourd was weighed in October of 2003 at a pumpkin festival in Canby, Oregon.

This record is not in Guinness's World Records. They list one a few pounds lighter.
Tyler Akins! <>
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