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Historical

  • 2008-07-13: Many years ago in England, pub owners hung illustrated signs instead of ones with words because the general population simply could not read.
  • 2008-07-13: Easter Sunday was moved to coincide with a Saxon festival held in the spring honoring the goddess of fertility. Under Saxon law, Christians were forbidden to practice their religion. To avoid suspicion and escape religious persecution, the Christians started to celebrate Easter on the same day as the Saxon festival.
  • 2008-07-13: The parking meter was invented by Carl Magee in 1935.
  • 2008-07-13: IBM was first known as the Computing Tabulating Recording Company. Initially, they made meat scales and punch clocks. In 1924, it changed its name to IBM. It is also known as "Big Blue" because of its reputation of being the bluest of all chips on the stock market.
  • 2008-07-13: The Harlem Globetrotters were formed by Abe Saperstein in 1926. They are not from Harlem, but the name was to imply the players were proud of their heritage. They were so good that no other team wanted to play against them. Instead, these basketball players are forced to give the public a show instead of a competitive match.
  • 2007-12-03: Julius Caesar's face appeared on all Roman coins during his rule. Because Caesar believed his likeness to be all-knowing, criminal disputes were tried by a flip of a coin ("heads or tails").
  • 2007-12-03: The U.S. Presidental Elections are held in November because the best time for it to occur was at the end of harvest and just before winter, while roads were still clear.
  • 2007-12-03: Hoyle wrote his first rule book in 1742, "A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist." Besides Whist, it also listed rules for every game from backgammon to quadrille. He soon became the authoritative source for rules for all card and board games.
  • 2007-12-03: Putting candles on cakes comes from ancient Greeks. They worshipped Artemis, the goddess of the hunt and the moon. Part of the Greek celebrations included making moon cakes on the first night of the full moon. They were made from flour and honey, then candles were added as symbolic moonlight.
  • 2007-11-28: The red stripe that is on a barber shop's pole represents the old practice of bloodletting. At that point in time, you could get teeth filed by your barber along with the regular trimming services.
  • 2007-11-28: William Booth founded the Salvation Army in London, in 1878.
  • 2007-11-28: The song, "You're a Grand Old Flag" was first released in 1906 as "You're a Grand Old Rag" and was soon changed due to the public outcry.
  • 2006-11-03: In 1983, Tadahiko Ogawa, a Japanese artist, made a copy of the Mona Lisa completely out of toast.
  • 2006-10-23: Adolf Hitler's mother seriously considered having an abortion but was talked out of it by her doctor.
  • 2006-10-18: A B-25 bomber airplane crashed into the 79th floor of the Empire State Building on July 28, 1945.
  • 2006-10-12: The first person born in Antarctica was Emilio Marco Palma in 1978.
  • 2006-09-21: The first product to have a bar code was Wrigley's gum.
  • 2006-09-19: Napoleon III suffered from ailurophobia, which is a fear of cats.
  • 2006-09-13: 7-Up was created in 1929. The "7" comes from the size of the original containers: 7 oz. The "Up" comes from the direction the bubbles traveled.
  • 2006-08-16: The world's first passenger train made its debut in England in 1825.
  • 2006-08-01: Francis Bacon, the English philosopher, caught a case of pneumonia and died because he was wanted to find a better way to serve food. He tried stuffing a chicken with snow, which turned out to be worse for him than it was for the chicken.
  • 2006-08-01: The first zoo in America was in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • 2006-07-20: The spire on the Empire State Building was designed to be a mooring point for dirigibles.
  • 2006-07-05: King Arthur had his round table designed so that none of his knights would feel any more or less important than the others.
  • 2006-07-05: People are asked to not point at others because one it was thought that the index finger was the "witch's finger" and was used to cast evil spells. By not pointing at another person, you can't accidentally cast an evil spell.
  • 2006-07-05: In 1960, John F. Kennedy was the first president to be inaugurated hatless.
  • 2006-05-26: Gary Dahl started to sell pet rocks on April 1st, 1975. Surprisingly, he sold millions.
  • 2006-05-26: The Miss America Pageant was originally a floral parade until the judges realized that the marching women were more attractive than the flowers.
  • 2006-05-10: British pilots in World War II were issued playing cards that would reveal an escape map when soaked in water.
  • 2006-05-10: American Airlines saved $40,000 in 1987 when they eliminated one olive from each salad served in first class.
  • 2006-05-10: Due to the demand for metal during World War II, the Oscars at that time were made of wood.
  • 2006-04-13: Many cultures have stories about a "hare in the moon," a bunny equivalent to the man in the moon. Rabbits were seen as symbols of sacrificial death and eggs represented birth. Spring was often seen as the birth of a new year, thus the Easter bunny laying Easter eggs is representative of the death of one year and the birth of a new year.
  • 2006-04-13: Louis Houghton, a WWI soldier, introduced the Easter Lily to America in 1919 by bringing a suitcase of bulbs to the southern coast of Oregon. He distributed the bulbs to family and friends.
  • 2006-04-11: Easter has no fixed date because really devout people would once make a pilgrimage to the holy lands. They walked (remember, this was long ago) day and night to get there. To travel at night, they needed a source of light, and the full moon worked splendidly. Easter was, and still is, scheduled around a full moon so that the people walking to the holy lands would be able to see where they were going.
  • 2006-03-22: Cats were worshiped as gods and were traded like treasure in ancient Egypt.
  • 2006-03-22: Over 300,000 mummified cats were found in Egyptian ruins.
  • 2006-03-22: If a pet cat died in ancient Egypt, family members would shave their eyebrows as a sign of mourning.
  • 2006-03-21: Michigan was the first state to plow its roads.
  • 2006-03-21: Michigan was the first U.S. State to use a yellow dividing line.
  • 2006-03-20: Orange rinds were once used as contraceptive diaphragms.
  • 2006-03-07: A 1978 New York City law made it mandatory for dog owners to clean up after their dogs when taking them for walks. Before that law, city workers removed 40 million pounds of poo each year.
  • 2006-03-06: The first seeing eye dog was presented to its owner in 1938.
  • 2006-02-27: The last member of the family line, Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte died in 1945. He tripped over his dog's leash and died due to his injuries.
  • 2006-01-16: Egyptians loved licorice and entombed lots of it with the boy king Tutankhamen.
  • 2006-01-12: When Mount Pelee erupted in 1902 on the Caribbean island of Martinique, only two people survived; 29,000 were killed.
  • 2005-12-30: The first typewriters had the keys arranged alphabetically. The first typists could type so fast that they would jam the inner workings of the typewriter. Christopher Sholes designed the "qwerty" keyboard in 1873 so that the left hand would handle the most frequent letters (e, s, t, r, etc.), which slowed down the typists enough so that they would jam the typewriter much less often.
  • 2005-12-28: Peter Minuit purchased Manhattan in 1626 from the local tribe of Native American Indians. Minuit paid a total of $24 worth of goods. The name "Manhattan" was derived from a local Indian word meaning "where we were cheated."
  • 2005-12-28: The first grandparents day was created by Michael Goldgar, a 65 year old man from Georgia. Goldgar started a movement to celebrate grandparents and President Carter signed the bill in 1978, making it nationally recognized.
  • 2005-12-16: The violin was introduced by Claudio Monteverdi in 1624.
  • 2005-12-15: Mother's day was started by Anna Jarvis. She believed her own mother didn't get enough appreciation, so she set about to nominate a day to mothers. In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed the proclamation. Mother's day is celebrated on the anniversary of the death of Anna Jarvis's mother: May 10, 1908.
  • 2005-12-13: Putting wreaths on graves was originally deemed as giving gifts to the dead. There was a belief that if you give the dead gifts, those spirits wouldn't haunt the living. The wreath's strength came from the circle, which had the power to keep the spirit within its bounds.
  • 2005-12-13: Over 2,000 years ago, Hiero, the King of Syracuse, asked his mathematician, Archimedes, to solve a particularly perplexing problem. Hiero wanted to know the exact percentage of silver in his royal golden crown. The answer popped into Archimedes' head while he was in a bath. He was so excited that he ran through the streets naked, shouting "Eureka!" ("I've found it!")
  • 2005-12-12: The first diamond ring was given by Maximilian I, Emperor of the Roman Empire. In 1477, he asked his fianceé what he could give her to prove his love.
  • 2005-12-12: A child's rattle dates back as far back as 2,500 B.C. It sooths the infant, and early societies believed the noise it made would ward off evil spirits and protect the baby from demons.
  • 2005-11-28: Coffee originated in Arabia where the bean was first discovered. It spread to Turkey and eventually to Europe and the British Isles.
  • 2005-11-23: Turkeys were discovered in Mexico by the Spanish conquistadors in 1518. It was named after the country, which was considered exotic and mystical.
  • 2005-11-23: Napoleon Bonaparte took such offense at being served a German bread that he declared in French, "Pain pour Nicole," which translates to "bread for Nicole," his horse. The expression stuck and the bread has been called pumpernickel ever since.
  • 2005-11-21: Moxie was a soft drink, sold in the late 1800's, and was advertised as a tonic that would build up one's nerve. This was what started the phrase, "You've got Moxie!"
  • 2005-11-21: The southern U.S. is sometimes referred to as "Dixieland." This comes from the early 1800's when a New Orleans bank printed the French word "dix" on ten dollar bills.
  • 2005-11-21: Fortune cookies were invented by an American immigrant in 1918. Initially, the fortunes were short, inspirational bible verses. Since then, they have evolved into the less serious realm of predictions, sayings, and proverbs. (more)
  • 2005-11-18: Henry Ford developed twenty cars before success. The "Model T" gets its name from the 20th letter of the alphabet.
  • 2005-11-18: The 1950 Nash Rambler was the first vehicle with seat belts.
  • 2005-11-17: Tennessee is called "the volunteer state" due to how its residents responded to a need. During the Mexican-American War, Govenor Aaron Brown asked men to join up. 30,000 recruits answered the call and formed three regiments. Having that many men sign up all at once was such a shock that the state earned itself a nickname.
  • 2005-11-17: Chinese court dancers bound their feet in moderation to improve their performance. It led into a fashion statement for upper-class women, and finally was recognized as a cruel practice because of the resulting physical disabilities and deformities.
  • 2005-11-16: Dr. Joseph Guillotin of France is wrongly been credited for the invention of the Guillotine. Guillotin wanted to abolish the death penalty and promoted the use of a beheading device (already in use in other countries) as a humane interim solution. So many people died because of the device that the doctor's family was ashamed and changed their name.
  • 2005-11-16: It was proper etiquette in France during the 17th century to take "French leave" – leaving a social function without properly thanking the host.
  • 2005-11-16: People used to sell borrowed stocks in the hopes that the value will fall. If all goes well, the stock would be purchased back at a lower cost and the stocks would be returned to the actual owner and would keep the profit. If the stocks instead rise, the person is resigned to pay the difference to get the stock back to the original owner. This practice was referred to as "selling the bearskin before the bear is caught" and a market where the prices were falling was called a bear market.
  • 2005-11-14: 7-Up was first advertised as a tummy soother for babies. It was first known as "Big-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda." C.L. Grigg, the product's inventor, changed its name to a bankrupt chocolate bar company that produced a bar having seven different fillings.
  • 2005-11-07: The Swiss Guard (Papal guards and guards of the Vatican) had their uniform designed by Michelangelo over 500 years ago. The only change since that time happened in the 1970's when they were issued gas masks. The Swiss Guard have been responsible for guarding the smallest city-state in the world for centuries.
  • 2005-11-03: In the 1800's, political candidates would ride into town on a trail that had a flat bed railroad car, which was called a "bandwagon." Musicians would play, the politician would speak, and then the music would flow again. If the politician was popular, people would loiter and make merry.
  • 2005-11-03: Samuel Wilson made his living as a government provisioner in 1812. To prevent tainted meat from being sent to the front lines, Wilson insisted the meat barrels be inspected and then stamped with U.S. He joked that the U.S. stood for "Uncle Sam," referring to himself. Now it refers to the U.S. government.
  • 2005-11-03: McDonald's originated as a drive-in restaurant in San Bernadino, California. In 1953, a milk shake machine salesperson saw the mascot, Speedy, with a hamburger in place of his head. He convinced the owners, Dick and Mack, to allow him exclusive franchise rights to the operation. In 1961, he bought the brothers out.
  • 2005-11-01: In 1893, Mr. Hires discovered a herbal tea made from berries and wild roots. He made it into a soft drink and called it root beer to give it a masculine name. The Women's Christian Temperance Union argued against it, but a lab test found that it contained less alcohol than a loaf of bread.
  • 2005-11-01: A deadline used to refer to a line around a military prison. If an inmate attempted to cross this boundary, he could be shot dead.
  • 2005-10-26: After the Norman invasions of England, young men would return to their farms after being at war for several years. They planted wild seed in the hopes for a good crop. It grew into a thick and luscious field, but the grain's head was too light and seldom worth harvesting. These young and inexperienced farmers were said to have sown wild oats against the advice of their elders.
  • 2005-10-26: In the middle ages, coins were often crude and not uniform. Counterfeit coins were abundant, but one way to tell them apart from the real currency was to drop them on a stone slab. A dull sound indicated a fake, and a real coin would "ring true."
  • 2005-10-25: Church bell ringing was a very serious matter in the Middle Ages. One would need years of training to get it right. Since it is a very loud job, students practicing would have the clapper removed from their bells, muting them. These bells were then called "dumb bells."
  • 2005-10-25: Having a feather in one's cap started in 1346. Edward, the Black Prince, led British troops into battle against great odds. When he won, he was awarded a crest depicting three ostrich feathers. After that, gallant knights started to receive feathers that were more exotic for the more heroic deeds. In the 1500's, British military and civilian headgear started to sport feathers.
  • 2005-10-24: Pickpocketing was considered a craft, and one would need to be an apprentice for quite some time before being considered proficient. It developed its own jargon, and each pocket that could be picked was given a different name. The breast pocket was the pit, the waistcoat was a jerve, the back trouser pocket was a prett, and the front side pocket (the most difficult to pick) was a sidekick.
  • 2005-10-18: Punishment for severe crimes in medieval England was typically death by hanging. Less serious offenses often had the perpetrator hung by his heels. It was the hope that they would think about how horrible it would be to have been hung the other way.
  • 2005-10-17: In medieval Britain, there was a designated area outside of a city where criminals were tortured and executed. It was common to find decomposing body parts strewn about, since burial wasn't a concern. The land was considered so uninhabitable that even the poor refused to register title even though they could obtain land portions for free. It was called "no man's land," and later referred to the territory between opposing fox holes in World War I.
  • 2005-10-13: After dinner in Victorian England, the gentlemen would retire to a smoking room to drink and smoke cigars. The ladies would also head to their room. An hour or so later, the two parties would reunite in what was called the drawing room.
  • 2005-10-13: In the 1700's, the Dutch claimed portions of land in what is today's New York City. Anticipating an attack from the British, they built a wall around their main military headquarters, which is today's business district of Manhattan. Wall Street was a road that actually ran right alongside this protective wall.
  • 2005-10-12: Michelangelo's Moses has horns and was likely shaped that way in error. In Hebrew, the words for "ray of light" and for "horns" have the same spelling.
  • 2005-10-07: The first hot tub was invented by Candidio Jacuzzi (1903-1986) for his son, who suffered from rheumatoid arthritis.
  • 2005-10-07: Toilet paper was first introduced in America by Joseph Gayety in 1857. Sales were slow because everyone used store catalogs in their outhouses   they provided both reading material and wiping material. Sales didn't pick up until it was introduced in a roll form.
  • 2005-10-07: Sun tan lotion was invented in the 1940's to help out American soldiers that were fighting in the South Pacific and weren't used to the amount of sun that was there.
  • 2005-09-09: The "lemon yellow" Crayola® crayon was introduced in 1949 and retired in 1990.
  • 2005-09-08: Alfred Nobel, a Swedish engineer, manufacturer, and philanthropist, patented his invention of dynamite in 1857. He left his fortune in "trust" and established the "Nobel Peace Prize" for those who conferred the greatest benefit on mankind.
  • 2005-09-07: Neck ties were not always used strictly as a fashion accessory. Ancient Roman soldiers used them for warmth in the winter and as a sweat band in summer. Also, during the French Revolution, they were worn like team colors; a symbolic gesture of where one's loyalty lay.
  • 2005-09-07: The British pop rock group, the Animals, were formed in 1962 and were originally called the Allan Price Combo. Their fans gave them another name due to their stage behavior and the band liked it so much that they changed names.
  • 2005-09-06: In 1683, Austrians successfully defended Vienna against Turkey. Polish-born Kulyeziski was instrumental in defending the city and was rewarded with all of the coffee the Turkish army left behind. He opened a café in Vienna and commissioned a baker to create a moon-shaped food. The baker came up with croissants.
  • 2005-09-06: The reason that barns, houses, and schools were painted red in the 1800's in the United States was because it was easy to make red paint. It was created from milk, lime, and iron oxide (rust). The iron oxide, readily available in the soil, gave the paint its color.
  • 2005-09-06: Goyathlay was a legendary Indian chief who relentlessly fought the expansion of the white man. In order to escape the U.S. cavalry, he jumped from a cliff while screaming his name in Spanish; "Geronimo!" This daring act was later depicted in a 1940's film and at about the same time, U.S. paratroopers began screaming his name as they jumped from their planes.
  • 2005-08-24: Sailors wore gold earrings for two reasons; they believed it improved their eyesight and it also could ensure a decent burial if they drowned and were to wash ashore.
  • 2005-08-24: The U.S. Pentagon was drafted in 1941, during the second World War. At that time, steel was in high demand and there was a shortage. The building's name was determined by the building's shape, and the shape was determined by the necessity to conserve structural steel.
  • 2005-08-16: The first ferris wheel was created by George Ferris for the World's Exposition in Chicago. In 1893, he was the head architect for the exposition and was determined to prove American superiority in architecture and structural engineering. He wanted something to beat the success of the Eiffel Tower, built in 1889 for the Paris Exposition. So, he spent $385,000 and created a 250-foot diameter ferris wheel that held 2,000 people at one time. It was created almost entirely out of wood and had rooms that would carry 60 people at once.
  • 2005-08-08: A bear was found separated from his mother and badly burned in a 1950 forest fire. The rangers adopted him and used him to promote their message to avoid carelessly starting these devastating occurrences. He was then named Smokey Bear.
  • 2005-08-08: Marlboro cigarettes originally were marketed for women with their choice of two "beauty filter tips" that kept the paper away from their lips. Sales were poor, so they started to market to men and they became wildly popular.
  • 2005-08-08: The Pinkerton Agency launched an ad campaign in 1925 with a large picture of an eye and the slogan, "We never sleep." Because of the advertising, a private investigator is now also known as a private eye.
  • 2005-08-05: In Siam, white elephants (albinos) were believed to harbor the soul of an ancient god. It was draped with jewelry and worshiped. Because it was never put to work, it then received the symbolism of being a drain on funds.
  • 2005-08-05: P.T. Barnum brought a white elephant to the U.S. in 1863 for over $200,000.
  • 2005-08-04: Nissan originally was named Dat after its three financial backers, Den, Aoyama, and Takeuchi. It was changed to Datson and later modified to Datsun when it was realized that "son" is too close to the word "loss" in Japanese.
  • 2005-08-04: When the marketing team held the pantyhose containers in their hands, it reminded them of an egg, and so they named it L'eggs pantyhose.
  • 2005-07-28: Nicotine and tobacco were introduced to France in 1560. The French ambassador, Jean Nicot, sent the plant from Portugal to France. It became so popular and addictive that it was named in his honor.
  • 2005-07-19: The color purple was associated with royalty because it was difficult to find purple things to dye cloth. A Phoenician found that the murex sea snail has a substance in its spiny shell that is ideal for a base for dyes, and produced the royal purple color that only royalty wore.
  • 2005-07-18: Dalmatians were used by fire departments because of its stamina, great lung capacity, and its sheer volume when barking and howling. People would hear the dog and get out of the way. When firetrucks became motorized in the 1920's and 30's, the dogs were promoted to passengers. Since then, they have been the fire department's mascot.
  • 2005-07-18: Levi Strauss originally came to the California Gold Rush in 1850 to sell tents to prospectors. He noticed that traditional clothing was wearing out quicker than tents, so he turned his attention to canvas clothing. So durable were his designs that prospectors were soon asking for his clothing by name ("Levi's").
  • 2005-07-14: Prior to the 14th century, judges in China wore sunglasses in order to help disguise their reactions to presented evidence.
  • 2005-07-14: The U.S. government commissioned the manufacture of sunglasses for Air Force pilots.
  • 2005-07-11: Wisk started sales in 1956 as the "miracle for family wash." Sales were slow, so in 1967 they changed their advertising campaign and said that it aided housewives in removing "ring around the collar."
  • 2005-07-11: The Spanish, like most Europeans, would work six hours and then break for an afternoon nap, called a siesta. Siesta is based on the Spanish word for six.
  • 2005-07-08: There were no judges before the second half of the 13th century. High level clergy assumed that role, but the church eventually forbade the clergy from legal proceedings. The new job of judge was created and from the beginning, they wore robes. These gowns evolved into elaborate fashion statements and were made of silk and fur. When Queen Mary II died in 1694, the judges put on black robes, and kept them even until today.
  • 2005-07-08: Scotland Yard is built on property that was given to the King of Scotland in the 10th century by King Edward because the King of Scotland paid numerous visits to England. The land was a plot of crown land adjacent to West Minster Abbey. When King James I came into power, he reclaimed the property for his own government offices, which was named in tribute to the King of Scotland.
  • 2005-07-08: Big Ben was going to be named St. Stephen's. In the mid 1800's, the bell (and not the whole tower) was named after London's Commissioner of Works, Sir Benjamin Hall. It was most appropriate, since the bell alone weighs 13 tons and Benjamin was known to be a very large man.
  • 2005-07-07: Iosif Vissarionovich Djugashvili was a Russian peasant, but he changed his name for phonetics and image and decided upon Stalin since it sounds like steel in Russian.
  • 2005-07-07: James Smithson was an English scientist, whose estate's proceeds started the Smithsonian Institute in 1846.
  • 2005-07-06: Vincent van Gogh did have deep emotional and mental instability, but he did not cut off his ear because he was insane. He successfully amputated a highly infected portion of his ear.
  • 2005-05-10: The U.S. first borrowed $190,000 in 1789 due to the request of both the President and Congress. Since then, it has grown uncontrollably into the 8 trillion (as of Dec. 4, 2005) that exists today. (more)
  • 2005-05-04: "Mary Had a Little Lamb" was the first recorded words of human speech. Thomas Edison recorded the first five words in November, 1877, into his latest invention, the phonograph.
  • 2005-04-12: The first autopsy performed in the New World was in San Domingo in 1533. A priest wanted to determine if a body had one soul or two. Somehow he determined that the body had two souls.
  • 2005-04-08: In ancient Egypt, priests plucked every hair from their bodies, including their eyebrows and eyelashes.
  • 2005-04-04: In the past, when courts would sentence a criminal to death by a firing squad, they had the execution at dawn for two reasons; they believed on being swift with punishment and that time provided the shooters with a good view of their target.
  • 2005-03-28: In the 19th century, the British Navy attempted to dispel the superstition that Friday is an unlucky day to embark on a ship. The keel of a new ship was laid on Friday, she was named the H.M.S. Friday, commanded by a Captain Friday, and finally went out to see on Friday. Neither the crew nor the ship were ever heard from again.
  • 2005-03-22: Charles Osborne had the hiccups for 69 years.
  • 2005-03-11: The Red Baron's real name was Manfred von Richtofen.
  • 2005-03-11: When young and impoverished, Pablo Picasso kept warm by burning his own paintings.
  • 2005-03-11: In 1911, Bobby Beach broke nearly all of his bones in his body after surviving a barrel ride over Niagra Falls. Sometime later in New Zealand, he slipped on a banana and died from the fall.
  • 2005-03-09: It was made law that the dead would be wrapped in a wool shroud in England in 1666. This gave the wool trade and the general economy a boost. 148 years later, the law was repealed.
  • 2005-03-03: The Windsor Knot (a tie knot) was created by Edward VIII, duke of Windsor. He was an extremely well dressed and fashionable man and decided that knots on neck ties were too small and he then created this large and prominent knot.
  • 2005-03-03: During World War I, Cecil Booth (the inventor of the vacuum cleaner) was commissioned to use vacuums at London's Crystal Palace. Naval reserve soldiers, quartered in the building, were coming down with spotted fever. Doctors suspected germs were being transmitted and inhaled through dust particles. Booth's machines worked for two solid weeks and succeeded in ending the epidemic.
  • 2005-02-17: Schweppes patented a process to carbonate beverages back in 1783, but found difficulty keeping the gases in the bottle when the cork dried out. They rounded their bottle bottoms so that they couldn't be stood on end, keeping the cork wet.
  • 2005-02-15: Motown Records is the first black-owned record company in America. It was founded in Detroit in 1959 and was named after Detroit's nickname.
  • 2005-02-15: The British term for bathroom, loo, was derived from a French term. Before modern sewers and indoor plumbing, people would pitch their waste out of a window. It was common courtesy to forewarn anybody below by yelling "Gardez l'eau!" (Beware of the water!) When flush toilets were invented, the phrase was mangled into the present one-word term.
  • 2005-02-10: The song Chopsticks was written in 1877 by Euphemia Allen. At age 16, she wrote the waltz to play on her piano. She said that the correct way to play it was to chop the keys with the hands turned sideways.
  • 2005-02-08: The postage stamp was first issued in England in 1840.
  • 2005-02-08: In 1825, Thomas Drummond discovered how bright lime was when burned with an oxygen and hydrogen flame. He used it to help make observations between two mountains that were 107 km (67 mi) apart.
  • 2005-02-04: The world's first underground railroad, "The Tube," opened in Britain in 1863. It was used extensively during both World Wars to save thousands of lives during bombing raids.
  • 2005-02-04: The Liberty Bell / Freedom Bell is a famous symbol of American independence. Ironically, it was actually manufactured in England at a cost of $300. Of course, the first time that it was actually put to use, it cracked.
  • 2005-02-01: Ketchup was once sold and used as a medicine in the United States. In the 1830's, it was sold as Dr. Miles' Compound Extract of Tomato.
  • 2005-01-18: Jimmy Carter was the first U.S. President to have been born in a hospital.
  • 2005-01-14: Just after noon on January 15, 1919, a tank holding 2.5 million gallons of hot molasses burst open in Boston. A wall of boiling, sticky goo knocked down buildings, freight cars, and bystanders. 21 people and dozens of horses were killed in what would become known as the Great Boston Molasses Flood.
  • 2005-01-07: Before 1800, there were no separately designed shoes for left and right feet.
  • 2004-12-09: There was only 20 seconds' worth of fuel left when Apollo 11's lunar module landed on the moon.
  • 2004-12-02: The toes of mummies are wrapped individually.
  • 2004-11-30: Mickey Mouse made his screen debut on November 18, 1928, as the star in the first sound cartoon, Steamboat Willie. That day is considered Mickey's birthday.
  • 2004-11-30: Walt Disney was afraid of mice.
  • 2004-11-30: Mickey Mouse's name was originally Mortimer. Walt Disney's wife, Lillian, thought Mortimer was too pompous and suggested Mickey.
  • 2004-11-24: The Pilgrims called their new colony Plymouth in honor of their final port of departure.
  • 2004-11-24: During the Pilgrim's first winter, they couldn't plant crops and didn't have enough supplies to last until spring. Since they used to live in cities, they did not know how to hunt or fish. In their first month, they caught exactly one fish and shot no game. For a while, it seemed like they would go down in history as the world's most inept hunters and fishermen.
  • 2004-11-24: Benjamin Franklin declared that turkey should be the official entree of Thanksgiving.
  • 2004-11-24: The American Indian name for turkey is "firkee."
  • 2004-11-24: Turkeys lived in North America almost 10 million years ago.
  • 2004-11-23: William Bradford declared the first Thanksgiving celebration in the U.S.
  • 2004-11-23: The Pilgrims had their name applied to them 170 years after their pilgrimage.
  • 2004-11-23: Of the 102 Pilgrims on the Mayflower, 35 of them were seeking religious freedom. They were "Separatists" from the Church of England. The others were "Strangers," and simply wanted to leave England and start a new life elsewhere.
  • 2004-11-23: The Pilgrim's voyage of 3,000 miles (about 4,800 km) took 66 days (2 mph / 3.2 kph).
  • 2004-11-23: When the Pilgrims first landed on Plymouth Rock, they feared a possible attack by unfriendly Indians. Soon, they discovered that the local Indians were all dead due to smallpox. The settlers took this as divine providence and assumed God had cleared their way by killing off the natives.
  • 2004-11-22: The Pilgrims brought plenty of beer with them due to their distrust of foul water supplies. The water was purified by boiling when beer is made, making it safe to drink. The Mayflower had plenty of beer, which was a healthy nourishment and reminder of home.
  • 2004-11-22: The Pilgrims anchored at Plymouth, but would have preferred something more to the south. Due to a shortage of beer, they opted to land and settle in Massachusetts. Pilgrim leader William Bradford wrote in a diary dated December 19, 1620, "We could not now take time for further search ... our victuals being much spent, especially, our beer."
  • 2004-11-22: The Pilgrims considered beer to be essential to the social, cultural, and physical health of their fledgling communities, and a brew house was one of the first structures built in the winter of 1620-1621.
  • 2004-11-22: The successful fall harvest of 1621 meant that the Pilgrims would have enough food in order to survive their second winter. With much to celebrate in beating the odds of survival, a day of Thanksgiving was declared to include their Native American friends. Colonists and Indians together tapped a keg of beer, cementing the bond between the groups.
  • 2004-11-22: The Puritans brought three times as much beer as water when they crossed the Atlantic to the New World.
  • 2004-11-15: In the late 1800's and early 1900's, it was popular for a gentleman to give his fiancée a teacup when they became engaged. She was to drink tea every afternoon and think of him while they were apart.
  • 2004-11-15: During the times of arranged marriages, the groom's family told him whom he was to marry. The family very rarely let the groom see the bride before the wedding date. Not just the day of, but ever. The thought was that if the groom saw the bride beforehand and did not like the looks of her, he would protest the marriage. Therefore, when the groom lifted the bride's veil after the pronouncement of marriage, it would be his first time seeing her.
  • 2004-11-11: September was once the seventh month in the calendar. It used to have 30 days, but Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome circa 700 BC, changed the number of days in the month to 29. Julius Caesar changed it back to 30 in 46 BC.
  • 2004-11-11: November was once the ninth month in the calendar. It started out with 30 days, but Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome circa 700 BC, changed the number of days in the month to 29. Julius Caesar changed it back to 30 in 46 BC.
  • 2004-11-11: December was once the tenth month in the calendar. It used to have only 30 days, but Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome circa 700 BC, changed the number of days in the month to 29. Julius Caesar changed it to 31 in 46 BC.
  • 2004-11-11: October was once the eighth month in the calendar, and it always had 31 days (unlike several other months).
  • 2004-11-10: The month of April, once named Aprilis, was named to honor Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty. It once had 30 days, but Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome circa 700 BC, changed it to 29. Julius Caesar changed it back to 30 days in 46 BC.
  • 2004-11-10: March, originally named Maritus, was named after Mars, god of war. It always had 31 days, and was once the beginning of the year instead of January.
  • 2004-11-10: The month of May was once named Maius, after Maia – the goddess of spring. It always had 31 days.
  • 2004-11-10: June was once named Junius, after the goddess of marriage and well-being, Juno. It started out with 30 days, but Numa Pompilius (the second king of Rome circa 700 BC) changed it to 29. Julius Caesar changed it back to 30 days in 46 BC.
  • 2004-11-09: January was once named Januarius, meaning "of Janus." The month was made by Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome circa 700 BC. It started as having 29 days, but Julius Caesar changed it to 31 days in 46 BC.
  • 2004-11-09: February was once named Februarius, or month of Februa. Februa is the Roman festival of purification, held on February 15, which is possibly of Sabine origin. This month was made by Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome circa 700 BC. It had 28 days until about 450 BC, where it had 23 or 24 days (it alternated). Julius Caesar changed it to have 29 days on every fourth year and 28 otherwise.
  • 2004-11-09: There was a month between March and February called Intercalaris. It had 27 days and was abolished by Julius Caesar when he recreated the calendar system in 46 BC.
  • 2004-11-08: Cleopatra was not an Egyptian queen. Actually, there were seven women who reigned under that name. The seventh is the one that we are most familiar with. Also, none of the women were Egyptians; they were Macedonians.
  • 2004-11-04: Animal crackers are not really crackers. They are a type of cookie that was imported to the U.S. from England in the late 1800's.
  • 2004-11-03: A dentist invented the electric chair.
  • 2004-11-03: It was once required that ten witnesses were to be present at a marriage.
  • 2004-10-27: In France, over 30,000 werewolf cases were tried between 1520 and 1630.
  • 2004-10-26: In the 17th and 18th centuries, people in weird costumes and masks would go from house to house, singing and dancing to keep evil spirits at bay. These people were known as "guisers."
  • 2004-10-26: According to lore, the signs of a werewolf are:
    • Hairy palms
    • Claw for left thumbnail
    • Tattoos
    • Unibrow
    • Long middle finger
    • Lazy and tired throughout the day
    • Sleeps with mouth open
  • 2004-10-19: An early "cure" for insanity would be to sever the corpus callosum, the connecting fiber between the right and left hemispheres of the brain.
  • 2004-10-19: The X-ray was invented by Wilhelm Konrad Roentgen in 1895. He use the X at the beginning because X usually represents an unknown. Roentgen knew his invention worked, but didn't know how it worked.
  • 2004-10-15: In 1935, Jesse Owens set 6 track and field world records in one hour.
  • 2004-10-05: The Greek philosopher Aristotle believed the heart was the seat of mental processes, not the brain.
  • 2004-09-24: Some of the most popular lipstick shades in Renaissance England were named Rat, Horseflesh, Turkey, Blood, and Puke.
  • 2004-09-24: Some names for lipstick colors from 1580 to 1620 included Ape's Laugh, Smoked Ox, Chimney-Sweep, and Dying Monkey.
  • 2004-09-01: "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" was composed by Mozart when he was 5 years old.
  • 2004-08-30: A banana-shaped stamp was once used in the country of Tonga.
  • 2004-08-30: Before 1687, clocks only had an hour hand.
  • 2004-08-27: There were 3,000 teacups on the Titanic.
  • 2004-08-27: The Great Pyramid of Giza was built at approximately 3,000 BC.
  • 2004-08-27: For 3,000 years, until 1883, hemp was the world's largest agricultural crop, from which the majority of fabric was produced.
  • 2004-08-27: In AD 408, Alaric the Goth demanded a ransom of 3,000 pounds of peppercorn and other valuables such as silk as part of his ransom for Rome. The ransom was met, but the city was taken anyway in AD 410.
  • 2004-08-26: Niagra Falls was first crossed by tightrope in 1859.
  • 2004-08-18: In 1634, tulip bulbs were a form of currency in Holland.
  • 2004-08-18: The first sailing boats were built in Egypt.
  • 2004-08-18: The ballpoint pen was invented by Hungarian refugee Lásló Biro. It first saw action in the Air Force in World War II. When it was first sold to the public in New York on October 9, 1945, over 5,000 people crashed the gates at Gimbel's to buy one for $12.50. Full-page ads guaranteed it would work equally well at 20,000 feet or ground level, underwater or above.
  • 2004-08-18: The first lighthouse to use electricity was the Statue of Liberty in 1886.
  • 2004-08-18: The first jukebox was located in san Francisco in 1899.
  • 2004-08-17: The first human-made object to break the sound barrier was a whip.
  • 2004-08-17: In 1878, the first telephone book contained 50 names.
  • 2004-08-16: The first vacuum was so large it had to be brought to a house with horses.
  • 2004-08-09: The first VCR was made in 1956 and was the size of a piano.
  • 2004-08-05: The first filmed sport was boxing in 1894.
  • 2004-08-05: In 1926, the first outdoor mini-golf courses were built on rooftops in New York city.
  • 2004-08-05: Swimming pools in the U.S. contain enough water to cover San Francisco in a layer about 7 feet deep.
  • 2004-07-29: Theodore Roosevelt was the only U.S. President that was blind in one eye.
  • 2004-07-15: Brandy was used to fill thermometers before mercury.
  • 2004-07-14: Early marriages were by capture – the groom would kidnap the bride and take her away from her tribe with the help of a warrior friend, the best man. The friend would also help to fight off other potential suitors who wanted this woman and prevented the bride's family from finding the couple. The groom would put himself and his bride into hiding (the honeymoon). By the time the bride's family found them, the bride would already be pregnant. When the groom fought off other warriors who also wanted his bride, he would hold onto her with his left hand while fighting with his sword in his right hand. This is why the bride stands on the left and the groom on the right.
  • 2004-07-14: Traditionally, brides have been thought to be particularly vulnerable to evil spirits. Many wedding customs and traditions were originated as an attempt to fight away such evil. The veil was worn with the belief that it would disguise the bride and fool the evil spirits. It was not until 1800 in Britain that the veil came to symbolize modesty and chastity. Today, the veil remains the ultimate symbol of virginity.
  • 2004-07-14: Playing pranks on the newlywed couple was a tradition that began with the intention of warding off evil spirits. Loyal friends of the couple would do this in hopes that the spirits would take pity on the couple for already being picked upon enough, and would then leave the couple alone.
  • 2004-07-14: The tradition of having members of the wedding party dress alike was started with the hopes that this would cause confusion for the spirits and send them on their way.
  • 2004-07-14: Tradition says that the first member of the newlywed couple to purchase a new item following the wedding will be the dominant force in the relationship. As such, to this day, some superstitious brides will pre-arrange to buy a small item from one of the bridesmaids immediately following the ceremony.
  • 2004-07-13: The Romans didn't use chariots in ancient wars. They used them for sport and for transportation, not in war.
  • 2004-07-12: George Washington didn't have a middle name.
  • 2004-07-09: The first novel written on a typewriter was Tom Sawyer.
  • 2004-07-09: The shortest war in history was between Zanzibar and England in 1896. Zanzibar surrendered after 38 minutes.
  • 2004-07-07: In Shakespeare's time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes. When you pulled on the ropes, the mattress tightened. This made the bed firmer and better to sleep on. Thus the phrase, "Good night, sleep tight."
  • 2004-07-06: People in the time of Columbus did not believe the world was flat. Before that, in the dark ages, the church decreed that the world was flat. Before that, people living in Greece believed the world to be round.
  • 2004-07-02: July 4th, Independence Day, commemorates the formal adoption of the Declaration of Independence.
  • 2004-07-02: At one point, there were 15 stripes on the U.S. flag. People thought that having 1 star and 1 stripe per state would be nice. Later, they decided that the flag should only have 13 stripes (for the 13 colonies) and only add stars for each state adopted.
  • 2004-07-02: The American national anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner," is set to the tune of an old English drinking song. "To Anacreon in Heaven."
  • 2004-07-02: Gustave Eiffel devised the iron framework for the Statue of Liberty.
  • 2004-07-02: The Declaration of Independence was signed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • 2004-06-29: Hershey Kisses are called that because the machine that makes them looks like it is kissing the conveyor belt.
  • 2004-06-29: Firehouses have circular staircases since olden days where horses pulled the fire engines. The horses were stabled on the ground floor and they figured out how to climb straight staircases.
  • 2004-06-23: Since 1896, the beginning of the modern Olympics, only Greece and Australia have participated in every Olympic Games.
  • 2004-06-18: There have been two father / son teams as presidents. They were John Adams & John Quincy Adams and George Bush & George W. Bush.
  • 2004-06-16: Besides sewing the American flag, Betsy Ross ran a munitions factory in her basement.
  • 2004-06-16: The only real person to be a PEZ head was Betsy Ross.
  • 2004-06-16: M&M's were inspired by soldiers that were eating candy-coated chocolates. They wouldn't melt, so the soldiers would not get their fingers sticky.
  • 2004-06-15: Jethro Tull is not the name of the rock singer / flautist. Jethro Tull is the name of the band. The singer is Ian Anderson. The original Jethro Tull was an English horticulturist who invented the seed drill.
  • 2004-06-14: During WWII, Americans tried to train bats to drop bombs. They were unsuccessful.
  • 2004-06-14: The dome on Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home, conceals a billiards room. In Jefferson's day, billiards were illegal in Virginia.
  • 2004-06-14: The only member of the band ZZ Top to not have a beard had the last name Beard.
  • 2004-06-11: The oldest elected U.S. President was Ronald Reagan at age 69.
  • 2004-06-11: The youngest elected U.S. President was John F. Kennedy.
  • 2004-06-11: 8 U.S. Presidents were born as British subjects:
    Washington, J. Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, J. Q. Adams, Jackson, W. Harrison.
  • 2004-06-11: John W. Hinkley Jr. was the man who attempted to assassinate U.S. President Ronald Reagan.
  • 2004-06-11: Richard Nixon was the only U.S. President that was born in California.
  • 2004-06-11: None of the U.S. Presidents were only children (no siblings). The three that didn't have any true brothers/sisters were Clinton, Ford, and Roosevelt; they all had half-brothers and Ford also had half-sisters.
  • 2004-06-08: Stalin was 5 feet 4 inches tall.
  • 2004-06-08: Alexander the Great was an epileptic.
  • 2004-06-08: Stalin's left foot had webbed toes.
  • 2004-06-08: Stalin's left arm was noticeably shorter than his right.
  • 2004-06-07: Benito Mussolini would ward off the evil eye by touching his testicles.
  • 2004-06-07: The Baby Ruth candy bar was not named after Babe Ruth. It was actually named after U.S. President Grover Cleveland's baby daughter, Ruth, who was the nation's darling infant at the time.
  • 2004-05-28: Memorial day was originally created to remember the Civil War.
  • 2004-05-24: Don MacLean's song American Pie was written about Buddy Holly, The Big Bopper (Jiles Perry Richardson Jr.), and Ritchie Valens. All three were on the same plane that crashed, which was named "American Pie."
  • 2004-05-24: Napoleon constructed his battle plans in a sandbox.
  • 2004-05-18: Coca-Cola once had coke (cocaine), but it has since been removed from the recipe.
  • 2004-05-18: The cigarette lighter was invented before the match.
  • 2004-05-18: Anne Boleyn, one of the more famous Queens of England, had six fingers on one hand.
  • 2004-05-17: There were coffee flavored PEZ.
  • 2004-05-17: Alexander Hamilton was shot by Aaron Burr in the groin.
  • 2004-05-17: Michigan was the first state to have roadside picnic tables.
  • 2004-05-12: The United States has never lost a war in which mules were used.
  • 2004-05-12: Disney's character Goofy was originally named Dippy Dawg. Later, Dippy the Goof, Foofy, George G. Geef, Mr. X, Jacob Marley, Mr. Biker, Mr. Walker/Wheeler, and finally his last name of Goofey. Piecing the bits together gives us his full name of George "Goofy" G. Goofey. (Family tree)
  • 2004-05-11: As of March, 2003, the accepted cause of death for Napoleon is cancer.
  • 2004-05-11: It has been suggested that Napoleon suffered from attacks of hemorrhoids so severe that they actually influenced the result at the Battle of Waterloo.
  • 2004-05-11: In addition to scabies that Napoleon suffered from, the chronic skin disease neurodermititis (explaining his penchant for prolonged baths), rages, weeping fits, migraines, and dyursia (painful urination), a medical journal article in 1966 by Ayer proposed that all of these symptoms were the result of the parasitic disease schistosomiasis. This was said to be acquired during the Egyptian campaign of 1798.
  • 2004-05-11: Napoleon's hormones have been implicated as having important roles in his personality. These include suggestions of hyperthyroidism, Foehlich's Syndrome (pituitary deficiency), hypogonadism, Klinefelter's Syndrome (an extra X chromosome) and, as a bonus, undefined latent homosexuality.
  • 2004-05-11: Adolf Hitler was said to have only one testicle -- his right. Depending on the source, his left one was just missing or was undescended (hemicryptorchidism).
  • 2004-04-29: Until the 19th century, solid blocks of tea were used as money in Siberia.
  • 2004-04-08: Goldsmith Peter Carl Faberge is responsible for the world's most famous decorated eggs. His first creation was an egg within an egg. The outside shell consisted of platinum and enameled white. Inside rested an egg sporting a golden chicken and a jeweled replica of the Imperial Crown.
  • 2004-04-06: In the 13th century, the Pope set quality standards for pasta.
  • 2004-04-05: On January 15, 2003, Canadian Brent Moffatt pushed 702 18-gage needles into his body to claim the record for the most body piercings. Most went into his legs and feet, and taking them out later, he said, hurt more than putting them in.
  • 2004-03-26: Mark David Chapman killed John Lennon.
  • 2004-03-25: It is believed that the Irish introduced oatmeal to America.
  • 2004-03-19: Bingo was invented in 1888.
  • 2004-03-19: Canned food first appears in stores in 1888.
  • 2004-03-19: In 1935, the first baseball game is played at night under lights. Traditionalists are horrified.
  • 2004-03-16: Julius Caesar was stabbed to death on March 15th.
  • 2004-03-16: Prince was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on March 15, 2004.
  • 2004-03-12: The first petrol pump in the USA was installed in 1906.
  • 2004-03-12: Ford named a line of cars for the son of Henry Ford I -- Edsel Ford.
  • 2004-03-11: Ketchup started as a Chinese medicine.
  • 2004-03-11: In 1379, a girl was born in England, named Diot Coke.
  • 2004-03-10: July was once renamed Quintilis, or the fifth month (after March). Julius Caesar reformed the Roman calendar (hence the Julian calendar) in 46 BC. In the process he renamed Quintilis to July after himself. The month always had 31 days.
  • 2004-03-10: August was originally named Sextilis, or the sixth month (after March). Augustus Caesar clarified and completed the calendar reform of Julius Caesar. In the process, he also renamed this month after himself. August originally had 30 days. Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome circa 700 BC, changed it to be 29 days. Julus Caesar changed it back to have 31 days.
  • 2004-03-08: The Declaration of Independence was written on hemp parchment, not paper.
  • 2004-03-04: During the California Gold Rush of 1849, miners sent their laundry to Honolulu for washing and pressing. Due to the extremely high costs in California during these boom years, it was deemed more feasible to send the shirts to Hawaii for servicing.
  • 2004-03-03: The first CD pressed in the U.S. for commercial release was Bruce Springsteen's "Born in the USA."
  • 2004-03-02: The "57" on Heinz ketchup bottles represents the number of varieties of pickles the company once had.
  • 2004-02-20: Antoine cadillac, a french adventurer, founded the city of Detroit in 1701.
  • 2004-02-20: In the 1950's, the new, smaller Rambler was such a success for American Motors, they soon dropped the big Nash and Hudson cars.
  • 2004-02-19: Lipsticks changed from potted paints to bullet-shaped tubes during World War I.
  • 2004-02-19: In ancient Japan, a man could divorce his wife if he discovered that she was left-handed.
  • 2004-01-08: Leonardo Da Vinci may have invented the scissors, but shears were in use in Egypt around 1500 B.C. and modern cross-bladed scissors were in use in Rome by about 100 A.D.
  • 2004-01-08: It took Leonardo Da Vinci 10 years to paint Mona Lisa's lips.
  • 2004-01-08: Leonardo Da Vinci was able to write with one hand and draw with the other simultaneously.
  • 2004-01-08: Leonardo Da Vinci was a leftie and wrote his notes backwards -- you would need a mirror to read them normally.
  • 2003-11-26: In Mexico, the turkey was considered a sacrificial bird. As an article of tribute, Montezuma received about 1,000 turkeys every day from his subjects.
  • 2003-11-26: When U.S. astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buz" Aldrin sat down to eat their first meal on the moon in their historic 1969 voyage, their foil food packets contained roasted turkey and all the trimmings.
  • 2003-11-26: When Samoset first met the pilgrims in 1621, he said, "Welcome English. I am Samoset. Do you have beer?" This was the first contact the pilgrims had with any natives.
  • 2003-11-21: The tank gets its name from when it was first invented. In order to hide the fact that they were weapons, the rumor was circulated that these machines were cisterns to be used to haul water to Egypt. Hence they were called "tanks."
  • 2003-11-18: Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" for 1938 was Adolph Hitler.
  • 2003-11-13: In 1763, Laclede and Choteau founded a fur-trading post where the Missouri River flowed into the Mississippi. By 1880, this settlement, now known as St. Louis, was the raw fur center of the world.
  • 2003-11-12: U.S. Coins with ridges were originally made with precious metals. The ridges were used to easily detect people clipping or filing off some of the metal.
  • 2003-10-28: Sliced bread was introduced under the Wonder Bread label in 1930.
  • 2003-10-08: Attilla the Hun died of a nosebleed.
  • 2003-09-26: The first penny had the motto, "Mind your own business."
  • 2003-09-15: Dr Pepper has no '.' after the Dr since 1950.
  • 2003-09-15: Dr Pepper was the only soda company allowed to continue producing during WWII. The others needed to close due to sugar rationing, but Dr Pepper used a study to prove that the soda could be good for the assembly line workers making the bombs because of how blood sugars in people drop at certain times during the day.
  • 2003-09-12: Martin Luther nailed 95 thesis to the door of the Roman Church in Wittenberg in 1517.
Stalin's left arm was noticeably shorter than his right. Tyler Akins! <>
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