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  • 2006-11-17: For the same volume, cold water is heaver than hot water. This is for the liquid form only. Water is most dense at about 4° C (39° F).
  • 2006-11-03: Table salt is the only commodity that has not risen dramatically in price in the last 150 years.
  • 2006-11-03: An IRS employee tax manual has instructions for collecting taxes after a nuclear war.
  • 2006-11-03: The U.S. mint in Denver, Colorado, is the only mint that marks its pennies.
  • 2006-11-03: In Bavaria, beer is not considered an alcoholic drink, but rather a staple food.
  • 2006-10-18: There is a town in Texas called Ding Dong. In 1990, the population was only 22 people.
  • 2006-10-12: The space shuttle can acelerate to a speed of 27,000 kph (16,777 mph) in eight minutes.
  • 2006-10-12: Gloucestershire airport in England used to blast Tina Turner songs on the runways to scare away birds.
  • 2006-10-10: A single share of Coca-Cola stock, purchased in 1919 when the company went public, would have been worth $97,500 in 1997.
  • 2006-10-10: Each year, kids in North America spend close to half a billion dollars on chewing gum.
  • 2006-10-04: The hole inside a CD is exactly the same size as the old Dutch 10 cent coin called the dubbeltje.
  • 2006-10-03: Boiled water freezes faster than unboiled water, assuming they start at the same temperature.
  • 2006-09-21: False: No single piece of paper can be folded in half consecutively more than seven times.
    True: If you use thinner and larger sheets of paper, you can fold it more. The Mythbusters "folded" a piece of paper that was the size of a football field 11 times with the help of a steamroller and forklift.
  • 2006-09-12: A Boeing 747's wingspan is longer than the Wright brothers' first flight.
  • 2006-09-07: The first owner of the Marlboro Company died of lung cancer.
  • 2006-08-22: The shortest snake is the Leptotyphlops bilineata. The longest one of those was 10.8 cm (4.5 in). If you remove the lead in a pencil, it could fit inside.
  • 2006-07-20: If one were to jump off of the Empire State Building, there would be a good chance that the first thing you'd hit would not be the sidewalk or pavement. The updrafts and the building's own gravity will slow you and suck you into the building.
  • 2006-07-20: If you toss a penny off of the Empire State Building, it will reach its terminal velocity of about 106 mph. If it lands and hits someone, it would probably leave a welt and could cause a head injury, but it doesn't have nearly enough mass to go into your body nor embed itself into cement.
  • 2006-06-28: The only town clock that strikes ship's time is in Wellfleet, Massachusetts. It strikes once every half-hour, which means only 48 rings a day.
  • 2006-06-05: Peanut oil can be processed to produce glycerol, which can be used to make nitroglycerin, which is part of dynamite.
  • 2006-06-05: There are 293 ways to make change for a dollar. Dollar coins are not counted, since you wouldn't be "breaking" the dollar.
  • 2006-06-01: The cruise liner, Queen Elizabeth II, moves about 8-9.5 meters (26-31 feet) for every 3.8 liters (1 gallon) of fuel burned. She uses 18 tons of fuel per hour.
  • 2006-05-25: Maine is the only U.S. State whose name is only one syllable.
  • 2006-05-23: The glue on Israeli postage stamps is certified kosher.
  • 2006-05-23: Approximately 200 people are killed worldwide by elephants annually.
  • 2006-05-16: There are no clocks in Las Vegas casinos.
  • 2006-05-16: You won't sink in quicksand if you slowly raise your legs and lie on your back. Then you can roll out to safety.
  • 2006-05-05: Alcohol-related expenses cost the U.S. $184.6 billion annually.
  • 2006-05-05: Cigarette smoking costs the U.S. $137 billion annually.
  • 2006-05-05: Underage drinking costs the U.S. $53 billion annually.
  • 2006-05-05: Cocaine-related problems cost the U.S. $47 billion annually.
  • 2006-05-04: If you place a raisin in a glass of soda pop, beer, or champagne, the raisin will sink, but the bubbles will cause it to rise to the surface. Once it is floating, the bubbles will pop and the raisin will fall again.
  • 2006-05-02: 40% of McDonald's profits come from the sales of Happy Meals.
  • 2006-05-02: 315 entries in Webster's 1996 dictionary were misspelled.
  • 2006-04-25: George Washington had two sets of false teeth made. Both were made of Hippopotamus ivory, not wood nor whale bone as was commonly believed.
  • 2006-02-14: Catgut, the material used to make strings for tennis rackets and musical instruments, does not come from cats. Instead, the real stuff is made from the intestines of sheep and hogs, and there are synthetic versions available.
  • 2006-02-07: Headaches cost the U.S. industry $50 billion annually.
  • 2006-02-07: Obesity costs the U.S. more than $900 billion annually for all related medical expenses.
  • 2006-02-07: Bad medical practices cost the U.S. $390 billion a year.
  • 2006-02-07: U.S. stress-related costs are estimated to be $300 billion annually.
  • 2006-02-07: The common cold costs $40 billion a year in the U.S.
  • 2006-02-07: PMS costs the U.S. economy $2 billion a year.
  • 2006-01-30: Foreign plants and animals cost the U.S. $100 million annually.
  • 2006-01-30: To recover from one hail storm in 2003, it cost $149 million.
  • 2006-01-16: Maine supplies 90% of all lobsters for the U.S.
  • 2006-01-16: Maine produces 75 million cans of sardines annually.
  • 2006-01-11: In the U.S., the state of Wyoming gets the most per capita for anti-terrorist funds – over $38 per resident.
  • 2005-12-30: The word "news" is said to be an acronym and represent that it covers all important information in all directions: north, east, west, south.
  • 2005-11-09: Excommunication is complete when you hear the sound of a bell tolling, a book being closed, and a candle being extinguished. The extinguished candle is symbolic of eternal darkness.
  • 2005-08-15: Time-release capsules are "timed" by the thickness of the coating on the outside of the pill.
  • 2005-08-15: The U.S. Government has its paper currency manufactured exclusively by Crane and Company of Dalton, Massachusetts. The recipe has remained mostly unchanged since 1879 and includes cotton, linen, fluorescein, and metallic elements.
  • 2005-07-28: The star, which is currently associated with law enforcement personnel, was thought to protect people from evil spirits in primitive cultures.
  • 2005-05-06: The rhyme, "Mary Had A Little Lamb," was based on a true story.
  • 2005-04-22: It takes approximately 1 gallon of water to process a quarter pound of hamburger.
  • 2005-04-22: It takes about 2072 gallons of water to create 4 new tires.
  • 2005-04-22: In 2000, hydropower and traditional biomass created the most energy, if you were to exclude fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas).
  • 2005-04-22: As of 2003, Japan leads the world in photovoltaic (solar cell) power production.
    The U.S. dominated until 1998, but Japan produced 49% of the world's solar power in 2003.
  • 2005-04-07: Each of the letters in the "HOLLYWOOD" sign in California are 45 feet tall.
  • 2005-03-18: When you lick a stamp, you are consuming 0.4 Joules (0.1 calories).
  • 2005-02-03: Proportionally speaking, the Earth is far smoother than a billiard ball.
  • 2005-02-02: If each count were one second long, it would take 11.6 days to count to a million and 31.66 years to count to a billion.
  • 2005-02-01: Rubber bands will last longer if they are kept in a refrigerator.
  • 2005-01-19: Americans pay over $30,500 in federal, state, and local taxes every second.
  • 2005-01-17: A typical double-bed mattress contains as many as 2 million dust mites.
  • 2005-01-06: The Democratic Donkey was assigned to Andrew Jackson initially as an insult of how stubborn he was. Mr. Jackson adopted the symbol and turned it to his advantage.
  • 2005-01-06: The song, Happy Birthday to You was just another song with different lyrics. Two Kentucky school teachers, Mildred and Patty Hill, wrote a song in 1893 as a daily greeting to their class. Good Morning to All was altered and in 1924, they discovered their song published in a song book but the second stanza was changed. A third sister successfully sued for the royalties when she learned that this song was used in the 1934 musical, As Thousands Cheer.
  • 2004-12-10: If you could drive to the sun at 88.5 kph (55 mph), it would only take about 193 years.
  • 2004-12-07: There are 318,979,564,000 possible ways of playing the first four moves in chess.
  • 2004-12-07: A water faucet with a leak the size of a pinhole will waste 170 gallons of water in 24 hours.
  • 2004-12-07: A silicon chip that is 1.25 cm (¼ in) square has the capacity of the original 1949 ENIAC computer, which occupied a city block.
  • 2004-12-03: Rennin, the enzyme obtained from the fourth stomach of a calf, is chiefly used in the manufacture of cheese. It is capable of coagulating more than 25,000 times its weight in fresh milk.
  • 2004-12-03: If you mix milk and vinegar and wait a few minutes, you can strain out a goo that can be used as glue. If you then pat it dry with a paper towel, add a little baking soda, and mix very well, you will get a slime or ooze.
  • 2004-12-03: When glass breaks, the cracks move at speeds of up to 4,800 kph (3,000 mph).
  • 2004-12-02: The surface speed record on the moon is 17 kph (10.56 mph) and was set by a lunar rover.
  • 2004-11-29: A desk is capable of supporting 10 million microbes and the average office has 20,961 microbes per square inch, according to research.
  • 2004-11-19: U.S. quarters, nickels, and dimes are currently made from nickel and copper.
  • 2004-11-19: U.S. pennies are currently made from copper plated zinc.
  • 2004-11-19: Abraham Lincoln faces to the right on U.S. currency because the penny portrait was an adaptation of a plaque.
  • 2004-11-19: On the back of a U.S. Roosevelt dime, the torch in the center signifies liberty, the oak branch on the right is a sign of strength and independence, and the olive branch on the left stands for peace.
  • 2004-11-19: An a U.S. dollar bill, there is an owl hiding on the front. If you look in the upper right-hand corner, there is a 1 in a shield sort of thing. On the top left of the shield is a little dot-looking thing. Under magnification, it turns out that it's an owl.
  • 2004-11-16: It is considered lucky to be married when the hour and minute hands are ascending – that means the hands are on the left-hand side of a clock. Thus, a morning wedding is luckier than an afternoon wedding and a marriage starting on a half-hour is luckier than a marriage starting on the hour. The most lucky time to tie the knot is said to have your ceremony wrap up at noon, when the hands on a clock are "praying."
  • 2004-11-15: Traditionally, the wedding band is worn on the inside with the engagement ring on the outside. This is so the wedding band is always the one closest to your heart.
  • 2004-11-04: In a single production shift, 30 miles of string is used to make the handles on Barnum's Animal Cracker boxes. That runs to 8,000 miles each year.
  • 2004-11-04: 15,000 cartons and 300,000 animals are produced each hour in Barnum's Animal Cracker bakery.
  • 2004-11-01: From the Internal Revenue Service Publication 525, page 13, category Miscellaneous Taxable Income, subcategory Illegal Income: "Illegal income, such as stolen or embezzled funds, must be included in your gross income on line 21 of Form 1040, or on Schedule C-EZ if from your self-employment activity."
  • 2004-11-01: Drug dealers, muggers, and thieves are expected to cough up their taxes just like the rest of us – and they're also allowed to deduct business expenses. According to Jenny McCune at Bankrate.com, these are legitimate criminal deductions:
    • Hit Man: Bullets, mileage for driving to target
    • Counterfeiter: Printing press, green ink, paper
    • Moonshiner: Corn, wire coils for still
    • Arsonist: Matches, rags
    • Cattle Rustler: Rope
  • 2004-10-22: Telephones harbor up to 25,127 microbes per square inch. A computer keyboard only has 3,295 per square inch and computer mice have 1,676. In contrast, a toilet seat contains 49 per square inch.
  • 2004-10-22: Cold and flu viruses can survive on surfaces for up to 72 hours.
  • 2004-10-22: Bacteria levels are reduced by 99% when you clean your desk and objects on your desk with disinfecting wipes.
  • 2004-10-18: In 1997, there were 41,967 people killed in motor vehicle accidents in the U.S. 16,189 fatalities were alcohol-related. This translates to one alcohol-related death every 32 minutes, on average.

    In 2001, the numbers were a bit better. 37,795 deaths with 15,585 relating to alcohol. On average, that's 34 minutes between alcohol-related deaths.
  • 2004-10-15: The proper response to the Irish greeting, "Top of the morning to you," is, "And the rest of the day to yourself."
  • 2004-10-12: Columbus Day in the U.S. is officially October 12th, but it is observed on the closest Monday.
  • 2004-10-12: The largest city named after Christopher Columbus depends on whether or not you include the metro area. According to 2001 population estimates, the city of Columbo, Sri Lanka, has the most populated metropolitan area with 2,234,289 residents and 377,396 in the city itself. Columbus, Ohio, has 711,470 within its city limits, and a total of 1,612,694 within the entire metro area.
  • 2004-10-11: Caffeine is on the International Olympic Committee list of prohibited substances. Athletes who test positive for more than 12 mg of caffeine per ml of urine may be banned from the Games. This level of caffeine may be reached by drinking 4 or 5 cups of coffee.
  • 2004-10-11: A 12 oz can of Coca-Cola has 46 mg of caffeine. A cup of coffee has 60-150 mg.
  • 2004-10-08: Each year in the United States, about 200,000 people require hospitalization for head injury and 52,000 people die due to head injuries. Another 1.74 million people have mild traumatic brain injury that requires them to visit a doctor or disables them for at least one day.
  • 2004-10-07: Bicycle helmets reduce the risk of head injury by as much as 85% and reduce the risk for brain injury by as much as 88%.
  • 2004-09-29: Sweetbread is neither sweet nor bread. Sweetbreads are from a calf's or lamb's pancreas or thymus.
  • 2004-09-24: Fish scales and squashed beetles are common lipstick ingredients.
  • 2004-09-10: A leaking toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water a day without making a sound.
  • 2004-09-10: A standard garden hose can put out as much as 20 gallons of water per minute. A hose that is left on by mistake can waste as much as 28,000 gallons in just 24 hours.
  • 2004-09-09: 30 gallons of water are used for the average shower in the United States.
  • 2004-09-09: To save a 40-foot tree, a stack of newspapers averaging 4 feet in thickness must be recycled.
  • 2004-08-30: If you add up the opposing sides of nearly all six-sided dice, you will get 7.
  • 2004-08-27: One million Americans, about 3,000 each day, take up smoking each year. Most of them are children.
  • 2004-08-27: At Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas, over 3,000 ounces of orange juice are poured daily.
  • 2004-08-27: Approximately 3,000 people die each day from Malaria.
  • 2004-08-26: If you started with one penny and doubled it daily for 30 days, you would end up with $5,368,709.12
  • 2004-08-26: The mouth of the Statue of Liberty is 3 feet wide.
  • 2004-08-25: The most recent year that appeared the same rotated upside down was 1961. It won't happen again until 6009.
  • 2004-08-24: TV dinners originated in the arctic.
  • 2004-08-23: The capitol building in Washington D.C. has 365 steps to represent every day of the year.
  • 2004-08-23: There are over 61,000 pizzerias in the U.S.
  • 2004-08-16: Blackboard chalk contains no chalk.
  • 2004-08-04: Over 450,000,000 cups of coffee are consumed in the U.S.A. daily.
  • 2004-08-04: Darkly roasted coffee has less caffeine than lightly roasted.
  • 2004-08-04: Contrary to popular belief, caffeine (or coffee) won't help someone sober up if they had too much to drink.
  • 2004-08-04: Caffeine causes changes in the chemicals of your brain, mainly in two ways.
    1) Adenosine normally slows down nerve impulses and causes drowsiness. The caffeine binds to the adenosine receptors in the brain, preventing adenosine from doing its job. This makes you more alert.
    2) Caffeine increases the levels of dopamine in your brain, which improves your feeling of well-being and improves your mood. It is the dopamine effect that is the root of caffeine's addictive properties.
  • 2004-08-03: Caffeine was first isolated from coffee in 1820.
  • 2004-08-03: In its pure state, caffeine is a crystalline white powder.
  • 2004-08-03: Caffeine is found in 60 different plants.
  • 2004-08-03: Caffeine is the most popular drug in the world. About 90% of Americans consume it in some form daily.
  • 2004-08-02: The chemical formula for nicotine is C10H14N2.
  • 2004-08-02: The chemical formula for sugar is C12H22O11.
  • 2004-08-02: The chemical formula for caffeine is C8H10N4O2.
  • 2004-07-28: The only country with a national dog is Holland, and it is the Keeshond, also known as Wolfsspitz (in Germany), Chien Loup (in France), or Lupini (in Italy).
  • 2004-07-28: The official state dance of Washington is the square dance.
  • 2004-07-27: Members of the U.S. Supreme Court are appointed for life.
  • 2004-07-20: One brow wrinkle is the result of 200,000 frowns.
  • 2004-07-20: You don't need to be a lawyer to be a U.S. Supreme Court justice.
  • 2004-07-19: Despite their reputation, there have been no deaths attributed to tarantula bites recorded in history.
  • 2004-07-15: There are 112,000 speeding tickets issued daily in the U.S.
  • 2004-07-13: Minnesota's state rodent is the thirteen-striped ground squirrel, or gopher.
  • 2004-07-12: It is possible to water ski behind a rowboat. It's not easy, and you need a racing rowboat and a skilled team behind the oars.
  • 2004-07-06: If a statue in a park is of a person on a horse with both front legs in the air, the person died in battle. If the horse has one leg in the air, the person died due to wounds received in battle. If the horse has all four feet on the ground, the person died of natural causes.
  • 2004-07-02: There are 50 stars and 13 stripes (7 red, 6 white) on the U.S. Flag.
  • 2004-07-02: The Liberty Bell spells Pennsylvania as "Pensylvania" because at that time, there was no standardized spelling of the colony.
  • 2004-07-01: Every day, more money is printed for Monopoly than the U.S. Treasury.
  • 2004-06-30: Nutmeg is extremely poisonous if injected intravenously.
  • 2004-06-30: If you have 3 quarters, 4 dimes, and 4 pennies, you have $1.19. You also have the largest amount of money in coins (excluding the dollar coin) without being able to make change for a dollar.
  • 2004-06-30: The only two days of the year in which there are no professional sports games (MLB, NBA, NHL, NFL) are the day before and the day after the Major League All-Star game.
  • 2004-06-28: The three most valuable brand names are Marlboro, Coca-Cola, and Budweiser, in that order.
  • 2004-06-28: 10% of Russia's government's income comes from the sale of vodka.
  • 2004-06-28: 111,111,111 × 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321.
  • 2004-06-24: Constantino Brumidi fell from the dome of the U.S. Capitol while painting a mural around the rim. He died about four months later.
  • 2004-06-24: 35% of people who use personal ads for dating are already married.
  • 2004-06-24: The Ramses brand condom is named after the great pharaoh Ramses II who fathered over 160 children.
  • 2004-06-23: On average, 100 people choke to death annually on ballpoint pens.
  • 2004-06-21: If you toss a penny, it has a 49.5% chance of being heads. The heads side weighs more and will end up on the bottom.
  • 2004-06-21: When a coin is flipped, it has a good chance of not actually being flipped. It could just wobble and look like it is being flipped. Because humans often end up not actually flipping a coin, it is more likely that the "up" side when the coin was flipped will still be the "up" side when it lands.
  • 2004-06-21: The little bags of netting for gas lanterns (mantles) are so radioactive that they will set off an alarm at a nuclear reactor.
  • 2004-06-21: The band Steely Dan got their name from a sexual device depicted in the book, The Naked Lunch.
  • 2004-06-18: The "Father" of the United States is George Washington.
  • 2004-06-18: Another name for "Father Time" is the Grim Reaper.
  • 2004-06-14: In most advertisements, the time displayed on an analog watch is 10:10.
  • 2004-06-02: You will need to count to one thousand to use the letter A in the English language to spell a whole number.
  • 2004-05-28: Memorial Day is also called Decoration Day.
  • 2004-05-26: The song "A Horse With No Name" is by the group America. In 1972, it was the #1 hit, and Randy Newman says it is about "a kid who thinks he's taken acid."
  • 2004-05-25: According to recent research, women are inticed to buy more if they hear the sound of heels clicking on the floor.
  • 2004-05-25: The patron saint of accountants is St. Matthew.
  • 2004-05-25: Market research has found that light purple makes customers feel like spending money.
  • 2004-05-25: Americans spend over $650 million on golf balls annually.
  • 2004-05-25: The "Butt Brush" theory helps to determine aisle width in retail stores. If customers are touched from behind (the "butt-brush factor"), they become irritated and move on, without returning to buy. Aisles must be wide enough for people to pass without being touched.
  • 2004-05-25: According to experts, retail stores should put their signature item (suits at a men's clothing store) at the back of the store. This way, clients come to the store to buy the signature item and walk past all of the other merchandise. That encourages purchases of other items on the way in and out.
  • 2004-05-25: Both the "primitive hunting & gathering societies" and "left-brain vs. right-brain thinking" help to explain the difference in men's and women's present shopping patterns.
  • 2004-05-25: Retail anthropology is the field of study that determines if a retail store "works" or "doesn't work."
  • 2004-05-25: According to Paco Underhill, the worst location for a retail store is next to a bank. It takes consumers 25 feet to slow down from a quick walk. Because there is nothing to look at in a bank's window, consumers pick up speed and don't slow down fast enough to notice the store directly next to it.
  • 2004-05-25: The first 15 feet inside the door of a retail store is called the "transition zone" and before this space, shoppers feel as though they aren't actually in the store yet.
  • 2004-05-25: Upon entering a store, most shoppers head to the right.
  • 2004-05-25: All senses are used in varying amounts to persuade customers to make purchases.
  • 2004-05-25: Marketers plan campaigns to appeal to the right side of the brain. The right side is where the emotions and unconscious mind reside. This side is more susceptible to images and suggestions.
  • 2004-05-21: There are 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 possible color combinations on a Rubik's Cube.
  • 2004-05-21: The full name of the Barbie doll is "Barbara Millicent Roberts."
  • 2004-05-18: Coca-Cola contains neither coca nor cola.
  • 2004-05-14: Minnesota is first in the nation for the sales of fishing licenses per capita.
  • 2004-05-14: There are 158 species of fish in Minnesota.
  • 2004-05-14: The most caught types of fish in Minnesota are panfish, walleye, and northern.
  • 2004-05-13: Montelier, Vermont, is the only U.S. state capital without a McDonald's.
  • 2004-05-12: "Hang On Sloopy" is the official rock song of Ohio.
  • 2004-05-12: In Disney's Fantasia, the sorcerer's name is "Yensid" (Disney spelled backwards).
  • 2004-05-07: Snoopy's mother's name is Missy.
  • 2004-05-06: You burn about 7% more Joules (or calories) walking on hard dirt instead of pavement.
  • 2004-05-06: You would weigh less on top of a mountain than at sea level.
  • 2004-05-06: You burn more Joules (or calories) sleeping than you do while watching television.
  • 2004-05-06: Licking a stamp burns 4 Joules (10 calories).
  • 2004-05-05: A one-minute kiss burns 109 Joules (26 calories).
  • 2004-05-05: Frowning burns more Joules (or calories) than smiling.
  • 2004-05-05: There are over 30,000 diets on public record.
  • 2004-05-04: A mile on land and a mile on the ocean are not the same distance.
    (Hint: One is a nautical mile, the other is a statute mile.)
  • 2004-04-29: Alaska has more caribou than people.
  • 2004-04-29: There are more telephones than people in Washington, D.C.
  • 2004-04-28: The month of August has the highest percentage of births.
  • 2004-04-28: The Mona Lisa has no eyebrows.
  • 2004-04-23: There are 5 million millionaires in the U.S.
  • 2004-04-23: There was a $100,000 gold certificate in 1934. It wasn't in circulation -- it was used between federal banks.
  • 2004-04-23: The largest denomination of U.S. currency ever in circulation was a $10,000 bill.
  • 2004-04-23: The largest denomination of U.S. currency currently in circulation is the $100 bill.
  • 2004-04-23: The only actual woman that appeared on U.S. paper currency is Martha Washington. She was on the front of the $1 silver certificate for 1886 and 1891. She was also on the back of the 1896 $1 silver certificate.
  • 2004-04-23: For U.S. currency, it takes 490 $1 bills to weigh one pound. A million $1 bills would weigh 2040 pounds.
  • 2004-04-22: Recycled glass uses only 2/3 the energy needed to manufacture glass from scratch. That means, for every soft drink bottle that is recycled, enough energy is saved to run a television for 90 minutes.
  • 2004-04-22: The junk mail that Americans receive in one day could produce enough energy to heat 250,000 homes.
  • 2004-04-21: The average cost of a prom dress at this moment is $214.40.
  • 2004-04-21: The average cost of a tuxedo rental at this moment is $110.60.
  • 2004-04-21: The average amount spent by a prom-goer is $638.
  • 2004-04-20: No piece of paper can be folded in half more than 7 times without unfolding the paper first.
  • 2004-04-16: Superman is constantly moving his head, at super-speed, so any pictures taken will be a little blurry, protecting his secret identity.
  • 2004-04-13: A U.S. women's gymnastics balance beam is 4 feet tall and 4 inches wide.
  • 2004-04-12: 31% of companies operate in a passive-aggressive environment.
  • 2004-04-12: The calendar repeats itself every 14 years.
  • 2004-04-07: Easter falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox (the spring equinox in the northern hemisphere). If there is a full moon on the day of the equinox, Easter is after the following full moon.
  • 2004-04-07: The first day of spring can be March 20th or 21st. It changes because a year is not exactly 365 days, and it moves around a bit.
  • 2004-04-07: 10% more accidents occur the first week of daylight savings time.
  • 2004-04-07: Leap year happens on every year evenly divisible by four ... except those that are a multiple of 100 ... but it does happen on for the ones that are a multiple of 400 ... but not with ones that are evenly divisible by 1000 ... but it will on ones that are a multiple of 4000. Hopefully, by that time we won't be using the same calendar system. <grin>
  • 2004-04-06: There are more than 600 pasta shapes produced worldwide.
  • 2004-04-06: According to Miss Manners (a.k.a. Judith Martin), a fork is the only utensil to be used to eat spaghetti while anyone is looking.
  • 2004-03-31: 55% of people steal things from work. The #1 item stolen is legal pads. The #2 item is toilet paper.
  • 2004-03-26: "Hey Joe" was the debut single (topping the charts at No. 6 in 1967) for Jimi Hendrix Experience.
  • 2004-03-26: Richard Simmons' full name is Milton Richard Simmons.
  • 2004-03-25: A one-day weather forecast requires about 10 billion mathematical calculations.
  • 2004-03-24: The five members of the Rat Pack are Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Junior, Peter Lawford, Joey Bishop.
  • 2004-03-24: 17 of the biggest 20 hotels in the world are located within a 2-mile radius in Las Vegas. The largest, MGM Grand, has 5034 rooms.
  • 2004-03-23: There are 19 different animal shapes in the Barnum's Animal Crackers cookie zoo.
  • 2004-03-23: A 10 gallon hat holds less than a gallon.
  • 2004-03-23: You burn 84 Joules (20 calories) an hour chewing gum.
  • 2004-03-18: 30.5+ million people visit Las Vegas a year.
  • 2004-03-18: Approximately 4,000 people move to Las Vegas a month.
  • 2004-03-18: More than 100,000 couples obtain marriage licenses per year in Las Vegas.
  • 2004-03-15: Colonel Sanders was from Indiana.
  • 2004-03-11: Heinz ketchup flows at a rate of 25 miles per year.
  • 2004-03-10: The shingle virus is closely related to the chicken pox.
  • 2004-03-09: There are 19,000 different ways to order coffee at Starbucks.
  • 2004-03-09: 0.99999... = 1
    4/9 = 0.44444...
    5/9 = 0.55555...
    0.44444... + 0.55555... = 0.99999...
    4/9 + 5/9 = 9/9 = 1
    Therefore 9/9 = 0.99999... = 1
  • 2004-03-09: The average number of hours promised in a long-wear lipstick is 1,325 per tube. That's just over 55 days straight (including when you are sleeping).
  • 2004-03-03: A 2 x 4 isn't. It's actually 1½ x 3½.
  • 2004-03-01: U.S. Currency is not made out of wood pulp paper. It is made out of cotton.
  • 2004-03-01: The ink on U.S. currency is magnetic.
  • 2004-02-27: Minnesota's official state muffin is blueberry.
  • 2004-02-27: Minnesota's official state tree is the Norway pine or Red pine.
  • 2004-02-27: Minnesota's official state flower is the showy or pink and white lady's slipper.
  • 2004-02-27: Minnesota's official state bird is the loon.
  • 2004-02-27: Minnesota's official state fish is the walleye.
  • 2004-02-27: Minnesota's official state gemstone is the Lake Superior agate.
  • 2004-02-27: Minnesota's official state grain is wild rice.
  • 2004-02-27: Minnesota's official state drink is milk.
  • 2004-02-27: Minnesota's official state mushroom is the morell.
  • 2004-02-25: International Left-Hander's Day is August 13th.
  • 2004-02-23: If you are going to crash your car, move your thumbs to the outside of the steering wheel so you don't accidentally lose or damage them.
  • 2004-02-20: "Pica" (PY'-kah) is:
    • 1/6 of an inch
    • 4.233333 millimeters
    • 12 points
    • The compulsion to consume things not normally consumed (clay, coins, wood, needles, hair, etc.)
  • 2004-02-16: Woodwinds really are made of wood, except cheap plastic student ones. In the case of oboes and clarinets, the wood is a black African hardwood called grenadilia.
  • 2004-02-13: In the Western world, the superstition of Friday the 13th being unlucky stems from the Grand Master of the Knights Templar, Jaques Demolay. He was betrayed and arrested on Friday, October 13, 1307. Before he was burned at the stake, he said he would see his accusers in heaven within the year. Both Pope Clement V and the King Philip IV of France died the following year.
  • 2004-02-10: Brain waves can be used to operate an electric train.
  • 2004-01-28: There are 63,360 inches in a mile.
  • 2004-01-28: Lipstick outsells all other cosmetics on the market four to one.
  • 2004-01-14: The San Francisco cable cars are the only mobile U.S. National Monuments.
  • 2004-01-13: Chewing gum while peeling onions will keep you from crying. So will peeling the onion under running water or while submerged in water.
  • 2004-01-12: A ball of glass will bounce higher than a ball of rubber.
  • 2003-11-24: Honey and pure chocolate never spoil, but honey is the only naturally-occurring food that doesn't spoil.
  • 2003-11-24: The average smell weighs 720 nanograms.
  • 2003-10-09: The current record for stacking bowling balls without adhesive is set at 10 balls back in 1998.
  • 2003-10-03: It takes approximately 142.18 licks to get to the center of a Tootsie Roll Tootsie Pop.
  • 2003-10-01: Rubbing the groove between your lips and your nose in a circular manner will eliminate hunger and cravings for chocolate, sweets, and the like.
  • 2003-09-30: A U.S. quarter has 119 grooves around the circumference, which are called reeds. A dime has 118, a half dollar has 150, and a Susan B. Anthony dollar has 133.
Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. Tyler Akins <>
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